The Indian Analyst
 

South Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Volume - III

Contents

Preface

Introduction

Part - I

Inscription at Ukkal

Melpadi

Karuvur

Manimangalam

Tiruvallam

Part - II

Kulottunga-Chola I

Vikrama Chola

Virarajendra I

Kulottunga-Chola III

Part - III

Aditya I

Parantaka I

Gandaraditya

Parantaka II

Uttama-Chola

Parthivendravarman

Aditya II Karikala

Part - IV

copper-plate Tirukkalar

Tiruchchengodu

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

XIV.- Inscriptions of Parakesarivarman Uttama-Chola

No. 126 to 127 Chandrasekhara & Ghritasthanesvara temples

No. 123 to 125 Madhuvanesvara, Mahalingasvamin, Varaha-Perumal temples

No. 128 Madras Museum plates of Uttama-Chola

No. 129 to 133 Nagesvarasvamin, Umambesvara, Adimulesvara temples

No. 134 to 137 Virattanesvara, Ujjivanathasvamin, Nagesvarasvamin temples

No. 138 to 141 Mahalingasvamin, Vatatirthanatha, Nedungalanatha temples

No. 142 Manikanthesvara temples at Tirumullaivayil

No. 143 to 147 Adhipurisvara, Apatsahayesvara, Umamahesvara temples

No. 148 to 150 Sivayoganathasvamin, Siddhanathasvamin temples

No. 151 Umamahesvarasvamin temple at Konerirajapuram

No. 151-A  On the east and north walls of the same shrine

No. 126.—   ON THE SOUTH WALL OF THE MANDAPA IN FRONT OF THE CENTRAL SHRINE IN THE CHANDRASEKARA TEMPLE AT TIRUCHCHENDURAI[1]

This inscription, dated in the 2nd year of Parakesarivarman, registers a grant of land by Pudi Adittapidari to the stone temple built by her at Tiruchchendurai, to meet the cost of the expenses of a festival in connection with the solar eclipse.  Pudi Adittapidari may have been a daughter of Pudi or Maravan Pudiyar referred to in another inscription of king Parakesarivarman at Tiruchchendurai[2].  The king Parakesarivarman himself has to be identified with either Madhu rantaka Uttama-Chola or Aditya Karikala II. both of whom held the title Parakesarivarman[3].  The provision made for festivals on the day of the solar eclipse might suggest that in this second year of king Parakesarivarman there should have been at least one such eclipse.  If Parakesarivarman is identified with Madhurantaka uttama-Chola who succeeded to the throne in A.D. 971, we find that according to Dr. Schram’s “Eclipses of the Sun in India,” there were two solar eclipses in the year 972 which was the second year of Uttama-Chola.  Consequently it is not unlikely that the king referred to in this inscription Uttama – Chola.

Hail ! Prosperity ! In the 2nd year of (the reign of) Parakesarivarman I, Pudi Adittapidari, gave with libation of water these  two garden (lands) as per the same terms under which I purchased (them) (viz.,) the garden (land) which I purchased for 35 kalanju of gold in the second year (of the king’s reign) from Kachchuvan (Kasyapa) Tattanarayanan and thegarden (land) purchased from Paradayan (Bharadvaja ?) Isana Maran, to the lord of the stone temple at Tiruchchendurai for maintaining festivals (tiruvilappuram) of the lord of Tiruchchendurai for maintaining festivals (tiruvilappuram) of the lord of Tiruchchendurai on (the day of) the solar eclipse, (stipulating that) the maintenance of the (said) festivals of the lord of (this) stone temple constructed by me Pudi Adittapidari (should be met only) from the produce of the (said) gardens.  (The assembly of) all Mahesvaras shall protect this  (charity)

No. 127.- ON THE WEST WALL OF THE CENTRAL SHRINE IN THE GHRITASTHANESVARA TEMPLE AT TILLASTHANAM[4]

This inscription is dated in the 3rd year of Parakesarivarman and registers a gift of gold for a lamp by a certain Korran Arunmoli alias Vanavan Peraraiyan of Arrur in Mangadu-nadu.  The money presented was apparently utilized in purchasing a land which adjoined another granted by Nangai Varaguna-Perumanar.  This lady had been already referred to as the wife of Parantaka Ilangovelar and to have made a grant of land to the same temple in the 13th year of Rajakesarivarman (Gandaraditya).  It is now difficult to determine who this king Parakesarivarman is in whose reign the gift of Varaguna-Perumanar could be referred to.  Subsequent to Gandaraditya who ruled for about 18 years there must have ruled at least four kings before rajaraja I. succeeded to the throne in A.D. 985. viz., - Arimjaya, Sundara Chola Parantaka II., Aditya Karikala and Uttama-Chola of whom the first probably and the two last bore the surnames Parakesarivarman.  Consequently Parakesarivarman of our inscription must be identified with either Arimajaya whose records have not been found hitherto or with Uttama-Chola.  In all probability the reference appears to be the latter.

Hail ! Prosperity ! In the 3rd year of (the reign of) king Parakesarivarman, Korran Arunmoli alias Vanavan Peraraiyan a native of Arrur (a village) in [Ma]ngadu-nadu, gave [25 kalanju] of gold for burning one perpetual lamp day and night . . . . . . . . . . . at Tiruneyttanam.  Having received this twenty-five kalanju of gold . . . . . .. . . . . . ..  quarter sey (of land) given for a lamp by Nangai Varaguna-Perumanar; the northern boundary (is) to the south of (the channel called) Andanurvaykkal and the western boundary (is)  to the east of the mound which has never been leveled (for cultivation).  We, the assembly, the villagers (urom) and the temple servants (devakanmi) of Tiruneyttanam sold to Koran Arunmoli alias Vanavan Peraraiyan (the land) situated within the four great boundaries thus described without excluding any (portion) of the land within (unnilam) and executed a sale-deed (vilai-avanam).  (The assembly of) all Mahesvaras shall protect this (charity)


[1]  No. 319 of 1903.

[2]  See Madras Epigraphical Report  for 1908, page 88, paragraph 90.

[3]  The Director-General’s Archaeological Survey Report for 1904 – 05, page 122.

[4]  No. 277 of 1911.

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