The Indian Analyst
 

South Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Volume - III

Contents

Preface

Introduction

Part - I

Inscription at Ukkal

Melpadi

Karuvur

Manimangalam

Tiruvallam

Part - II

Kulottunga-Chola I

Vikrama Chola

Virarajendra I

Kulottunga-Chola III

Part - III

Aditya I

Parantaka I

Gandaraditya

Parantaka II

Uttama-Chola

Parthivendravarman

Aditya II Karikala

Part - IV

copper-plate Tirukkalar

Tiruchchengodu

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

IV.- Inscriptions at Manimangalam

No. 36 to 39 south, east wall of the mandapa in the perumal temple

No. 27 to 28 Rajgopala-Perumal temple

No. 29 outside of the east wall of the inner prakara

No. 30 north wall of the mandapa

No. 31 to 33 south, west wall of the mandapa

No. 34 to 35 outside of the east wall of the inner prakara

No. 40 to 41 east wall of the Dharmesvara temple

No. 36.- On the south wall of the mandapa in the Rajagopala-Perumal temple

This inscription is dated in the 12th year of the reign of Kulottunga-Choladeva III.[1] on a week-day which, according to Professor Kielhorn’s calculation,[2] corresponds to Monday, the 4th December A.D. 1189.  It records that a military officer purchased 600 kuli of land near the village and assigned them to the temple, with the condition that the produce of the land should be applied for providing offerings of boiled rice to the god.

(Line 1.) Hail ! Prosperity ! In the 12th year (of the reign) of the emperor of the three worlds, Sri-Kulottunga-Soladeva, who was pleased to take Madurai, Ilam, and the crowned head of the Pandya, - on the day of Chitra, which corresponded to a Monday and to the ninth tithi of the second fortnight of the month of Dhanus.

(L. 2.) the writing of us, the great assembly of Manimangalam, alias Pandiyanai-irumadi-ven-kanda-Sola-chaturvedimangalam, in Kunrattur-nadu, (a subdivision) of Kulottunga-Sola-valanadu, (a district) of Jayankonda-Sola-mandalam.

(L. 4.) With the knowledge of Karambichchettu Kesava-Bhattan, the manager of the temple of Vanduvarapati-Emberuman in our village, and of Arattamukkidasan, the overseer of the Sri-Vaishnavas.

(L. 5.) In order that (the god) Tiruvaykkulattu Emberuman of this temple might receive (every day) an offering of four nali of boiled rice Kannappan Tusi-Adinayagan[3] [Ni]la[ga]ngaraiyan Vanniyanayan, alias Uttamanidi-Kannappan, of Tiruchchuram in Kil-Mangattu-nadu, (a subdivision) of the same district and the same mandalam, purchased for money from the arbitrator Manimangalam-Udaiyan Vanavarisan, Mahajanapriyan and Manimangalam-Udaiyan Sriramadevan 600 kuli of land, (called) Urappondan, alias Alankarapatti,[4] to the east of the Manaiy-arudi channel[5] at the A[laimedu] (hill) in this village, to the south of the first Kannaru,[6] to the north-east of the Kannikkal (channel), to the north-west of the Tiruvidaiyattam[7] of this Alvar, (and) to the south of the large channel.

(L. 9.) Having received the gold required from the Vanniyanayan, alias Uttamanidi-Kannappar, we, the great assembly, gave these six hundred kuli, free of taxes, to continue as long as the moon and the sun.

(L. 10.) Having been present in the assembly and having heard the order of Donaiya-Bhattan of Aranaippuram, I, the accountant of this village, Adavallan Sivavakyadevan, alias Uttamapriyan, wrote (the above).  This (is) my writing.

No. 37.- On the east wall of the mandapa in the Rajagopala-Perumal temple.

This inscription is dated in the 28th year of the reign of Kulottunga-Choladeva III. and records that the same military officer who is mentioned in the preceding inscription (or a relation of his) deposited with the temple authorities a sum of money, from the interest of which four lamps had to be supplied with fuel.

(Line 1.) Hail ! Prosperity ! In the 28th year (of the reign) of the emperor of the three worlds, Sri-Kulottunga-Soladeva, who was pleased to take Madurai and the crowned head of the Pandya, - we two, Arattamikkidasan,[8] the overseer of the Sri-Vaishnavas in (the temple of) Vanduvarapati at Manimangalam in Kunrattur-nadu, (a subdivision) of Jayankonda-Sola-mandalam, and Sridhara-Bhatttan, who holds the feet of the god[9] of the central shrine, received from Kannappan Panchanedi Nilagangaraiyar of Tiruchchuram seven and seven twentieths old kasu, to bear interest from the month of Karttigai of this year.

(L. 10.)In return for (this sum), we, the authorities of the temple, agreed to burn, as long as the moon and the sun exist, four lamps, (viz.) two twilight lamps in the Vanduvarapati (temple), one twilight lamp in the central shrine, and one twilight lamp which (the two temples of) Tiruvaiyotti[10] and Tiruvayappadi have to burn in the Vanduvarapati (temple).

No. 38.- On the outside of the east wall of the inner prakara of the Rajagopala-Perumal temple.

This inscription is dated in the 13th year of the reign of Rajarajadeva (III.?).  It registers several payments of money into the temple treasury for feeding lamps in the temple.

Hail ! Prosperity ! In the thirteenth year (of the reign) of Rajarajadeva, - under the supervision of both Arulala-Bhattan of Irayur, the manager of the temple of Vanduvarapati-Emberuman at Manimangalam, alias Pandiyanai-irumadiven-konda-Sola-chaturvedimangalam, in Kunrattur-nadu, (a subdivision) of Kulottunga-Sola-valanadu, (a district) of Jayankonda-Sola-mandalam, and of Vanduvarapati . . . . . . . . . . . . the overseer of the Sri-Vaishnavas in this temple, - (the following sums) were paid on interest  into the treasury of the temple of Vanduvarapati-Emberuman, as a fund for burning lamps at evening dawn before this Emberuman : - one kasu by Arlala-Bhattan of Irayur ; one kasu b Mattu[va]li Sirilango-Bhattan ; one kasu by Emberuman-Adiyal [Vi]langavand[a]r of Minjur ; and one and a half kasu, for burning a lamp at evening dawn, by Kannandai Kuppan of Porungunram.

No. 39. – On the east wall of the mandapa in the Rajagopala-Perumal temple.

The subjoined inscription belongs to the 18th year of the reign of Tribhuvanachakravartin Rajarajadeva.  This king is probably identical with Rajaraja III., who is known to have ascended the throne about A.D. 1216 and seems to have been the immediate successor of Kulottunga-Chola III.[11]  In this case the week-day on which the inscription is dated will admit of astronomical calculation.  The inscription records that a flight of stone steps leading to mandapa was built at the expense of two brothers.

Hail ! Prosperity ! With the approval of the god,[12] - in the 18th year (of the reign) of the emperor of the three worlds, Sri-Rajarajadeva, on the day of Dhanishtha, which corresponded to a Wednesday and to the fifth tithi of the first fortnight of the month of Dhanus, - Brahmapriyan, the
eldest son of Manimangalam-udaiyan Panchanedi Lakshmanan Malaiginiyaninran,[13] and his younger brother Ahavamalladevan paid the gold required for, and caused to be made the stone work of, a flight of steps, with tiger’s heads at the bottom, for the Abhissheka-mandapa in the temple of Vanduvarapati-Emberuman at Manimangalam, alias Gramasikhamani-chaturvedimangalam, in Kunrattur-nadu, (a subdivision) of Puliyur-kottam, alias Kulottunga-Sola-valanadu, (a district) of Jayankonda-Sola-mandalam.  (It is) their charitable gift.

[1]  See page 43 above.

[2]  Ep. Ind. Vol. IV. P. 220.

[3]  I.e. ‘the chief leader of the van-guard.’

[4]  I.e., ‘the patti of Urappondan, alias Alankaran.’  On patti see above, Vol. II. p. 359, note 12.  Urappondan occurs as a proper name in No. 31, text line 11, and Alankaran in NO. 29, text line 24.

[5]  See above, p. 78 and note 6.

[6]  See above, p. 73, note 6.

[7]  See above, p. 78, note 8.

[8]  This name is spelled Arattamukkidasan, in Nos. 35 and 36.

[9]  I.e., who is one of the men who carry the idol on procession days.

[10]  This temple is probably identical with Tiruvaiyottidevar in No. 28, text line 11.

[11]  See page 43 above.

[12]  Literally, ‘the hearing of the holy voice having preceded.’

[13]  The same name is borne by a different person in No. 35 above.

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