The Indian Analyst
 

Annual Reports

 

 

Contents

Index

Introduction

Contents

Preface

PART I.

Personnel

Publication

Appendix A

Appendix B

Appendix C

Appendix D

Appendix E

Appendix F

PART II.

Introductory

Cholas of the Renadu country and Vaidumbas

Western Chalukyas

Eastern Gangas

Sailodbhavas

Early Cholas and Banas

Rashtrakutas

Western Chalukyas

Telugu Chodas

Kakatiyas

Velanandu Chiefs

Kolani Chiefs

Kona Chiefs

Cholas

Pandyas

Vijayanagara

Miscellaneous

General

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

VELANANDU CHIEFS

16,000 villages (verses 34 and 35). Goṅka II is represented in the same inscription as ruling over the whole Telugu country between Kāḷahasti and the Mahēndra Mountain (verses 41 and 42). But in his own inscriptions Goṅka II’s son Rājēndra-Chōḍa II is described as the viceroy of Triśatōttara-shaṭ-sahasra, i.e. 6300-country (No. 204 and S.I.I., Vol, No. 1138) which shows that the family must have been deprived of a portion of its dominion in the intervening period. This might have been possibly effected during the unsettled period which followed the death of Kulōttuṅga-Chōḍa I, when the Velanāṇḍu chiefs appear to have become tributary to the Western Chāḷukyas of Kalyāṇi In one instance his territory (probably ancestral) is stated to have comprised only 4 0 villages (S.I.I., Vol. IV, NO. 918). From S.I.I., Vol. IV, No. 1228, we find that Velanāṇṭi Rājēndrachōḍa whom Kulōttuṅga-Chōḍa I had adopted as his son was ruling the country as a vassal of Chāḷukya Vikramāditya VI in Śaka 1042. The epithet Chāḷukyarājyabhavana-mūlastamqha applied to Rājēndrachōḍa in No. 204 which is dated in Śaka 1093 appears to indicate his subordinate position under one of the two branches of the Chāḷukya dynasty. A similar epithet borne in Śaka 1028 by Velanāṇṭi Goṅkarāja (No. 277 of 1905) whom I identify with Goṅka I, evidently indicates his vassalage to the Eastern Chāḷukya throne. Nos. 239 and 204, both belonging to Mahāmaṇdalēśvara Rājēndra-Chōḍayarāja are dated respectively in Śaka 1092 and 1093, the former of which records a gift of land made to the temple of Tripurāntakadēva of Komāragiri by his servant Pōli-Nāyaka ‘the lord of [Ta]kkarapāḍu’. This officer is not known hitherto from inscriptions.

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