The Indian Analyst
 

Annual Reports

 

 

Contents

Index

Introduction

Contents

Preface

PART I.

Personnel

Publication

Appendix A

Appendix B

Appendix C

Appendix D

Appendix E

Appendix F

PART II.

Introductory

Cholas of the Renadu country and Vaidumbas

Western Chalukyas

Eastern Gangas

Sailodbhavas

Early Cholas and Banas

Rashtrakutas

Western Chalukyas

Telugu Chodas

Kakatiyas

Velanandu Chiefs

Kolani Chiefs

Kona Chiefs

Cholas

Pandyas

Vijayanagara

Miscellaneous

General

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

CHOLAS OF THE RENANDU COUNTRY AND VAIDUMBAS.

The Madras Museum plates of Srikantha-Choḷa.
7. From the Superintendent, Government Museum, Madras, was received during the year for review a set of copper-plates which contains three inscriptions of three different kings (Nos. 5 to 7 of App. A). The plates which are five in number measure 9 ¾ inches by 31/8” to 3 ¼” and have slightly raised rims all round. They are strung together on an elliptical copper-ring measuring 2 ½” by 2 7I8”. This passes through a ring-hole about ¾” in diameter, but unfortunately no seal is attached to the ring.

  The first which is the earliest of the three records is engraved on the inner side of the first plate, both the sides of the second and the third plates and on the upper half of the first side of the fourth plate. The second of the records is commenced on the second side of the fourth plate and continued and concluded on the lower half of the first side of the fourth plate. It is therefore evident that when this record was engraved the fifth plate was not in the set but must have been tagged on subsequently. It is also likely that the original seal, if any, that must have naturally belonged to the first set was removed or tampered with when this was tagged on, either wantonly or unwittingly. This suggestion seems to gain support from the fact that the third (and latest) of these inscriptions is of a different dynasty from the one to which the first two belong. At the back of the fifth plate is carved the figure of a shrine containing in it a linga on a pedestal and a standing bull in front. The set with the ring weighs 177 tolas.

  The fi rst of thSe inscriptions belongs to king Srikantha whose genealogy is traced from Brahman, through Marīchi and other mythological down

Home Page