The Indian Analyst
 

North Indian Inscriptions

 

 

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Introduction

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EDITION AND TEXTS

Inscriptions of the Chandellas of Jejakabhukti

An Inscription of the Dynasty of Vijayapala

Inscriptions of the Yajvapalas of Narwar

Supplementary-Inscriptions

Index

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

INSCRIPTIONS OF THE YAJVAPALAS OF NARWAR

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No. 160 ; PLATE CXXXXVII
A YAJVAPĀLA STONE INSCRIPTION FROM NARWAR
(Undated and Incomplete)

THE stone bearing this inscription was discovered by M. B. Garde, the then Director of Archaeology in the (former) Gwālior State, in 1925 A.C. It was found by him in a vegetable vendor’s (kūṅjaḍā’s) house, at Narwar, an ancient town in the Karērā tehsīl of the Siprī (Shivpurī) District of Madhya Pradesh. Garde, who removed the stone to the Archaeological Museum at Gwālior, briefly summarised the contents of the record in the Annual Report of the Department for the same year, where it is stated that the inscription was engraved during the reign of Āsalladēva of the Yajvapāla dynasty. Subsequently, the record was edited by Dr. D. C. Sircar, in Epigraphia Indica, Vol. XXXII, pp. 65 ff., and Plate. He has rightly shown that the epigraph did not belong to the time of Āsalladēva but to that of his son Gōpāladēva. as to be seen below. The inscription is edited here from the original stone, which I examined in the Museum, and an inked impression supplied by the Chief Epigraphist, to whom my thanks are due.

   The record is inscribed on the countersunk surface of a dark pinkish stone surrounded by a plain border, and measures 64∙5 cms. broad by 61 cms. high. It consists of eighteen lines of writing, covering a space 48∙3 cms. broad by 34∙5 cms. high. But a noteworthy feature of it is that it is incomplete. Its last line, which contains the concluding part of verse 22, ends with the first six syllables of a new stanza, but the rest of the verse was not incised, even though there is enough space below (about 10 cms. high).
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[1] There is a redundant vertical stroke here also.
[2] Originally khā with the mātrā scored later on.
[3] These letters are partly lost and hence cannot be distinctly made out.
[4] Originally syā with the mātrā scored on subsequently.
[5] These letters too are partly preserved and cannot be made out.
[6] The fourth foot does not appear to be metrical.
[7] The decimal figure is only a dot and the tail of the limit figure appears to have been left while engraving. It may have been 9.

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