The Indian Analyst
 

North Indian Inscriptions

 

 

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Index

Introduction

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List of Plates

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EDITION AND TEXTS

Inscriptions of the Chandellas of Jejakabhukti

An Inscription of the Dynasty of Vijayapala

Inscriptions of the Yajvapalas of Narwar

Supplementary-Inscriptions

Index

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

INSCRIPTIONS OF THE YAJVAPALAS OF NARWAR

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Nos. 162-74 ; PLATES CXXXXIX
BAṄGLĀ STONE PILLAR INSCRIPTIONS OF THE TIME OF GŌPĀLADEVA
[ Vikrama ] Year 1337

THE pillars which bear these inscriptions were all found on a waste land in the vicinity of a tiny hamlet known as Baṅglā situated about 8 kms. east of the fort of Narwar in the Shivpurī District of Madhya Pradesh. This site, which marks a battle-field, was first discovered in 1934-35 by the late M. B. Garde, who was then the Director of Archeology in the former State of Gwālior, now integrated with Madhya Pradesh. He noticed the inscriptions in general in his Annual Report of the department for V.S. 1991 (1934-35 A.C.), pp. 8 and 12, and enlisted seven of them in its appendix (Nos. 7-13). The site was also visited subsequently in 1955, by Dr. D. C. Sircar, as the Government Epigraphist of the Archaeological Survey of India, who prepared impressions of fifteen of these inscriptions ; and he edited seven of them
________________________

[1] is cut as mta.
[2] The number 23 is by mistake repeated in the original, and following it the subsequent numbers are continued. These I have retained here for the sake of facility.
[3] Most of the letters of the third quarter of this verse are mutilated and my reading is from the traces left. The consonant t is engraved as r, and m as .bh. Possibly bhūtyaṁbu is intended but it would not suit the metre.
[4] The reading is doubtful. The consonant of the first letter appears as s and the superscript of the second, as n
[5] The mātrā of u is clear, and the following akshara is engraved as ga.
[6] The sign of visarga, which was by mistake omitted first, was later on marked above its proper place.
[7] Some other aksharas were first engraved here.
[8] The second letter of the name is deformed. Sircar read it as ga, but the mātrā is clear on the original.
[9] The form of a petal is engraved after nē.
[10] These four aksharas are only to fill in the gap so as to complete the line. In the end, there is a heart-shaped design.

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