The Indian Analyst
 

North Indian Inscriptions

 

 

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EDITION AND TEXTS

Inscriptions of the Chandellas of Jejakabhukti

An Inscription of the Dynasty of Vijayapala

Inscriptions of the Yajvapalas of Narwar

Supplementary-Inscriptions

Index

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

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Volume 14

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Volume 18

Volume 19

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Part 1

Volume 22
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Volume 23

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Volume 26

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Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

INSCRIPTIONS OF THE CHANDELLAS OF JEJAKABHUKTI

No. 98: PLATE XCIV
KHAJURĀHŌ STONE INSCRIPTION OF YAŚŌVARMAN
[Vikrama] Year 1011

THE stone which bears this inscription is said to have been discovered, some time after 1843, amongst the ruins at the base of a temple known as the temple of Lakshmaṇajī at Khajurāhō[14] in the Chhatarpur District of the Vindhya region of Madhya Pradesh, and is now built into the wall inside the entrance porch of the temple. The inscription was briefly noticed by Genera Alexander Cunningham in his Archaeological Survey of India Reports, Vol. II, (1862-1865), pp. 425 f.[15] and again in ibid., Vol. XXI (1883-1885), pp. 65 and 84, where a small photograph of it was also published on Plate xvii-B. The record was first edited by F.
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[1] Metre: Śārdūlavikrīḍita. Kielhorn read the first letter in this line as (Sanskrit), but the vertical stroke that distinguishes it from (Sanskrit) is clear. It may also be noted that the last letter in this line is totally lost and has been adopted from Kielhorn’s reading.
[2] Metre: Upajāti. Kielhorn’s reading of the last two aksharas is (Sanskrit), but on the plate the first is a clear ha with the mātrā very distinct.
[3] Metre : Sragdharā, or Mandākrāntā, the last caesura of both of which is identical in syllabus.
[4] Metre : Anushṭubh. Kielhorn read the first letter of the line as (Sanskrit) but the initial loop of the letter in only ornamental.
[5] Metre : Sragdharā, or Mandākrāntā.
[6] Read ─Metre: Sragdharā.
[7] Metre : Āryā or its variant, i.e., Gīti or Upagīti.
[8] Metre : Anushṭubh.
[9] Metre : Śārdūlavikrīḍita.
[10] Metre : as above. The last two aksharas in this line are as suggested by Kielhorn.
[11] Metre : Anushṭubh.
[12] Meter : Ārya or its variant.
[13] Metre : Rathāddhatā or Svāgatā, both of which are distinguished only the interchange of the mātrās of the 9th and the 10th aksharas
   in each of its feet.
[14] Kujrow of the Indian Atlas, sheet No. 70. Situated at N. Lat. 24 ̊ 51’ and E. Long 80 ̊, this place is 43 kms. east of Chhatarpur and
   55 kms. south of Mahōbā, and is now connected with a metalled road with each of these places. The antiquities of this place are described
   by Cunningham in his A. S. I. R., Vol. II. pp. 412 ff. ibid., Vol. X. pp. 16 ff. and again in ibid., Vol. XXI, pp. 55 ff.
[15] Cunningham found the slab placed ‘sloping against the wall’ of the temple, and he also remarked that it was not seen by Burt in
    1838, but was obtained in course of repairs carried on to this temple by the Chhatarpur Rājā some time after 1843. In Burt’s time the temple
   was known as of Chaturbhuj.

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