The Indian Analyst
 

North Indian Inscriptions

 

 

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Introduction

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EDITION AND TEXTS

Inscriptions of the Chandellas of Jejakabhukti

An Inscription of the Dynasty of Vijayapala

Inscriptions of the Yajvapalas of Narwar

Supplementary-Inscriptions

Index

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

INSCRIPTIONS OF THE CHANDELLAS OF JEJAKABHUKTI

GWĀLIOR STONE INSCRIPTION OF MAHĪPĀLA

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No. 155 ; PLATE CXXXXII

GWĀLIOR STONE INSCRIPTION OF MAHĪPĀLA

Vikrama Year 1150

THIS inscription is engraved on two long stone slabs which were found inside the portico of the larger of the two neighbouring temples locally known by the name of Sāsbahū and situated on a projecting point near the middle of the eastern wall of the fortress of Gwālior, the headquarters of a district in Madhya Pradesh. The record was noticed by General Alexander Cunningham in his Archaeological Survey of India Reports, Volume II (1862-1865), pp. 357 ff., and from a facsimile supplied by him, it was edited by Rajendralal Mitra, with transcript and an abstract of its contents, in the Journal of the Bengal Asiatic Society, Vol. XXXI (1862), pp. 400 and 411 ff. It was re-edited, with translation and a facsimile, by F. Kielhorn in
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1 Sandhi is not made here.
2 The reading is certain, though the last letter is mutilated. But the name appears to be rather long and peculiar.
3 This akshara was totally lost even in Kielhorn’s time. From the context it appears to have been di.
4 At the end of the line there are two redundant curves, as also at the end of the next line. Gōshṭhika is a member of the managing committee.
5 After ni there are six redundant curves, as also after dra in the next line.
6 It is a coin, for which see C. I. I., Vol. IV, p. 195, n.
7 The daṇḍa is intended to show a paranthesis that follows. The grammar requires vāṭikāṁ.
8 Sandhi is not made here.

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