The Indian Analyst
 

South Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Preface

Introduction

Table of Contents

Text of the Inscriptions 

Part - I

Part - II

Part - III

Part - IV

Part - V

Other Inscription 

Chola Inscription

Telugu Inscriptions from Andra Pradesh

Pallava Inscriptions

Pandya Inscriptions

Telugu Inscriptions of the Vijayanagara Dynasty

Inscriptions Collected During 1903-1904

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

South Indian Inscriptions, Volume 2

Tamil Inscriptions

part - iii

inscriptions of the CHOLA DYNASTY

No.77 On the west base of the anekatangapadam temple at kanchipuram

In the first volume I published an inscription of Kambana-Udaiyar, which records that, in the time of Kulotltunga-Choladeva, the Rajasimhavarmesvara temple at Kanchipuram had been closed, its landed property sold, and its compound and environs transferred to the temple of Anaiyapatanga. This temple is situated close to the Raja-simhavarmesvara (now Kailasanatha) temple. In its inscriptions and in the Devaram, it bears the slightly different name Anekatangapadam. It contains three inscriptions, one of which records a private grant,[1] while the two others (Nos. 77 and 78) are dated during the reign of Kulottunga-Choladeva.

The king, to whose reign the inscriptions Nos. 77 and 78 belong, is identical with Kulottunga-Choladeva I. This follows from the fact that, in other inscriptions which open with the same introduction, he receives the surname Ko-Rajakesarivarman, which was borne by Kulottunga-Chola I., and that, in a few inscriptions with the same introduction, he is said to have put to flight Vikkala and Singana, who must be identified with Vikramaditya VI. And Jayasimha IV. Of the Western Chalukya dynasty.

The subjoined inscription records that, in the 20th year of his reign, Kulottunga-Choladeva granted to the Siva temple of Anekatangapadam in Kanchipuram three veli of land in the village of Tamar, alias Nittavinodanallur, in Tamar-nadu, a subdivision of Tamar-kottam. According to Mr. Crole’s Chingleput Manual (p. 439), the district of “Tamal-kottam” was situated in the west of the Conjeeveram talluqa The village of Tamar must be accordingly identified with the modern Damal.[2] As in an inscription of Kambanna-Udaiyar (Vol. I, No. 88), Kanchipuram is here said to have belonged to Eyir-kottam, a district of Jayankonda-Sora-mandalam. Eyil, after which the district of Eyir-kottam was called, must be distinct from the distant village of Eyil in the South Arcot district, with which I proposed to identify it on a former occasion. Perhaps the term Eyil, i.e., ‘the Fort,’ refers to Kanchipuram itself. Jayankonda-Sora-mandalam is another name of Tondaimandalam.

Translation

Hail! Prosperity! In the twentieth year (of the reign) of Sri-Kulottunga-Soradeva, who,— while the goddess of Fame became renowned (through him), while the goddess of Victory was coveting (him), while the goddess of the Earth became brilliant (with joy), (and) while the goddess with the (lotus) flower (i.e., Lakshmi) wedded (him),— had put on by right of inheritance the excellent crown of jewels; who had caused the wheel of this (authority) to roll over all regions, so that the Minavar (Pandyas) lost (their) firmness, the Villavar (Cheras) trembled, (and) the other kings were defeated and suffered disgrace;[3] and who, having anointed himself (in commemoration of his) victories, was graciously seated on the throne of heroes together with (his queen) Puvana-murd-udaiyal,[4]— the king was pleased to order that it should be engraved [on stone] and on copper that three veils of wet land (nir-nilam) were given,— for defraying the daily expenses,[5] including the antarayam, free of taxes, as a devadana, excluding one field (pulam) which is situated within (the land granted, and) which is a devadana of the temple of Bhimesvara within the village,— to (the god) Mahadeva of the holy Anekatangapadam (temple), who is the lord of Kanchipuram, a city in Eyir-kottam, (a district) of Jayankonda-Sora-mandalam.

(The land granted) is situated to the west of the village of Tamar, alias Nittavinodanallur, in Tamar-nadu, (a subdivision) of Tamar-kottam. The northern boundary (is) to the south of the temple of Ganapati. The eastern boundary touches the kuri[6] (belonging) to the temple (kottam) o Kumara, on the south of this the temple of Kali, and on the south of this the bottom of a sluice (tumb-adi). The southern boundary (is) to the north of a field (seruvu), which is a tiruvidaiyattam,[7] at the bottom of the sluice. The western boundary is to the east of the causeway (? Manpadu) on the bank of the tank.

The king having ordered thus, Kulottunga-Sora-Brahmarayan caused (the above) to the engraved on stone.

No. 78. On the south base of the Anekatangapadam temple at Kanchipuram.

Like No. 77, this inscription belongs to the time of Kulottunga-Choladeva I. It is dated in the 34th year of his reign, the records that the king granted 2 velis of land to the Anekatangapadam temple at Kanchipuram. The land granted was situated in the southern portion of Kanchipuram, to the north of the temple of Tirukkarrali-Mahadeva, i.e., of the Rajasimhavarmesvara (now Kailasanatha) temple, to the east of the hamlet of Putteri,[8] to the west of ‘the royal wall of Rajendra-Chola,’[9] and to the south of the hamlet of Kir-Putteri, i.e., ‘Eastern Putteri.’

As the land granted bordered on the Kailasanatha temple, it is not impossible that it formed part of those gifts of Kulottunga-Choladeva, which were declared to be unlawful and were restored to the Kailasanatha temple in the time of Kambana-Udaiyar.

Translation

Hail! Prosperity! In the thirty-fourth year (of the reign) of Sri-Kulottunga-Sora-deva, who, &c.,[10]— the king was pleased to order that it should be engraved on stone that two veils of wet land on the southern side of the land belonging of Kanchipuram were given,— for defraying the daily expenses, including the antarayam, free of taxes, as a devadana, including the breach (udaippu) in the pit on the north where pandanus trees grow (vada-taram-pallam),[11] (and) which is situated within (the land granted),— to (the god) Mahadeva of the holy Anekatangapadam (temple), who is the lord of Kanchipuram, a city in Eyir-kottam, (a district) of Jayankonda-Sora-mandalam.

(The land granted) is situated to the north of the temple of Tirukkarrali-Mahadevar, to the east (of the hamlet) of Putteri, to the west of the royal wall of Rajendra-Soran, and to the south (of the hamlet) of Kir-Putteri.

The king having ordered thus, Pallavadaraiyar caused (the above) to be engraved on stone. 


[1] This inscription (N. 23 of 1890) appears to be dated in the Nala samvatsara, and records that the authorities (tanattar) of the Anepatanga (thus) temple assigned 1400 kuris of the temple land to certain weavers (? Kaikkolar) who were connected with the temple.

[2] No. 1 on the Madras Survey Map of the Conjeeveram talluqa.

[3] Instead of the last few words, four other inscriptions read: “(and) Vikkala (and) Singana plunged into the western ocean;” see note 1.

[4] I.e., ‘the mistress of the whole world.’ In No. 78 this name has the slightly different form Puvanamurudum-udaiyal.

[5] Nimandam is another form of nivandam, the Sanskrit nibandha.

[6] According to the Dictionnaire Tamoul-Francais, this is a land measure of 576 square feet.

[7] This term is probably synonymous with devadana; see the Index to Vol. I, s.v. tiruvidaiyattam.

[8] Putteri-teruvu is still the name of the street, which leads from Conjeeveram to the Kailasanatha temple.

[9] It appears from this that Rajendra-Chola and built a fortification wall round Kanchipuram.

[10] The introduction of this inscription is identical with that of No. 77.

[11] The same term occurs in an inscription of Kambana-Udaiyar.