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Saturday, May 05, 2007



   

BELGIUM

Contact numbers of other wings of the Mission

 

Fax (Chancery)  00-32-2-648 9638
Fax (Commerce)   00-32-2-648 9638
Tele Fax (Consular)  00-32-2-648 9638
Telephones (Chancery)  00-32-2-640 91 40; 645 1850

Email addresses

Ambassador’s office ambassador@indembassy.be  DCM’s office dcm@indembassy.be
Head of Chancery hoc@indembassy.be

 

BASIC FACTS ABOUT BELGIUM

Name of the country        : Kingdom of Belgium

Capital                           : Brussels

Name of Provinces and

Provincial capitals            : There are 10 provinces and three regions:

                                      Antwerpen, Brabant Wallon, Brussels*, Flanders*, Hainaut,

                                      Liege, Limburg, Luxembourg, Namur, OOst-Vlaanderen,

                                      Vlaams-Brabant, Wallonia*, West-Vlaanderen

                                      * three regions

Population                      : 10,364,388 (July, 2005 est.)

Area                              : 30,582 sq. kms.

Currency                        : Euro

Languages spoken            : Dutch (official) 60%, French(official) 40%, German(official) less

                                      than 1 % legally bilingual (Dutch and French)

Time Zone                      : IST (-) 4 ½ hours(winter) ; -3 ½ hours(summer)

President                        : King ALBERT II

Prime Minister                  : Guy VERHOFSTADT

Foreign Minister               : Karel De Gucht

Defence Minister              : Andre Flahaut

Finance Minister               : Didier Reynders

Commerce Minister            : Marc Verwelghen (Min. for Energy, Foreign Trade, Economy & Science)

Official Website Links to HOG/HOS/Foreign Ministry/Commerce Ministry in

Belgium:

Prime Minister: http://verhofstadt.fgov.be

President: www.monarchie.be

Foreign Ministry: http://www.diplomatie.be/en/default.asp

Trade Ministry: http://www.beligum.be

Name and address and contact details of the central bank:

Banqe Nationale de Belgique, Blvd. de Berlaymont 14,

B-1000, Belgium

Tel: 32-2-221 21 11

Fax: 32-2-221-31 00

Website: www.nbb.be

Basic foreign, international trade policies:

Since 1921 Belgium has had an economic union with Luxembourg - the Belgium -Luxembourg Economic Union (BLEU). As members of the EU, with the exception of agriculture, both Belgium and Luxembourg have relatively open market economies. Although trade and investment figures have traditionally been combined for the two countries, separate data for Belgium was made available for the first time in 1998. Belgium leaders over the years have invested considerable time and energy in the EU integration process. Outside the EU the most important bilateral relationship is with USA and countries of central Africa (its former colonies). It pursues economic diplomacy with countries of Asia and Middle East and North Africa.

Belgium's top four export markets in 2004 were all in the EU, with Germany, France and the Netherlands ranking as Belgium's top three. The BLEU is a major trade entrepot for the rest of Europe.

 

Membership to organisations:

ACCT, AfDB, AsDB, Australia Group, Benelux, BIS, CE, CERN, EAPC, EBRD, EIB, EMU, ESA, EU, FAO, G- 9, G-10, IADB, IAEA, IBRD, ICAO, ICC, ICCT, ICFTU, ICRM, IDA, IEA, IFAD, IFC, IFRCS, IHO, ILO, IMF, IMO, Interpol, IOC, IOM, ISO, ITU, MIGA, MONUC, NATO, NEA, NSG, OAS (observer), OECD, ONUB, OPCW, OSCE, Paris Club, PCA, UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNHCR, UNIDO, UNMIK, UNMOGIP, UNRWA, UNTSO, UPU, WADB (non-regional), WCL, WCO, WEU, WHO, WIPO, WMO, WTO, ZC

Major industries, global companies etc:

Engineering and metal products, motor vehicle assembly, transportation equipment, diamonds, biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, electronics, scientific instruments, processed food and beverages, chemicals, basic metals, textiles, glass, petroleum Agricultural products; sugar beets, fresh vegetables, fruits, grain, tobacco; beef, veal, pork, milk

Significant economic activities such as agriculture, mining, knowledge industries

services such as financial services, shipping, tourism etc:

Belgium is located at the heart of one of the world's most highly industrialized regions. The first country to undergo an industrial revolution on the continent of Europe in the early 1800s, Belgium developed an excellent transportation infrastructure of ports, canals, railways, and highways to integrate its industry with that of its neighbors. One of the founding members of the European Community (EC), Belgium strongly supports deepening the powers of the present-day European Union to integrate European economies.

With exports equivalent to about 69% of GDP (Euros 283 billion), Belgium depends heavily on world trade. Belgium exports twice as much per capita as Germany and five times as much as Japan. Belgium's trade advantages are derived from its central geographic location, and a highly skilled, multilingual, and productive work force.

The Belgian industrial sector can be compared to a complex processing machine: It imports 3 raw materials and semi-finished goods that are further processed and re-exported. Except for its coal, which is no longer economical to exploit, Belgium has virtually no natural resources. Nonetheless, most traditional industrial sectors are represented in the economy, including steel, textiles, refining, chemicals, food processing, pharmaceuticals, automobiles, electronics, and machinery fabrication. Despite the heavy industrial component, services account for 74.6% of GDP. Agriculture accounts for only 1.4% of the GDP.

Belgian Economy in the 20th Century:

Belgium is the 18th largest economy as per World Bank report of 2004. For 200 years through World War I, French-speaking Wallonia was a technically advanced, industrial region, while Dutch-speaking Flanders was predominantly agricultural. This disparity began to fade during the interwar period. As Belgium emerged from World War II with its industrial infrastructure relatively undamaged, the stage was set for a period of rapid development, particularly in Flanders. The postwar boom years, enhanced by the establishment of the EU and NATO headquarters in Brussels, contributed to the rapid expansion of light industry throughout most of Flanders, particularly along a corridor stretching between Brussels and Antwerp (now the second-largest port in Europe after Rotterdam), where a major concentration of petrochemical industries developed.

The older, traditional industries of Wallonia, particularly steelmaking, began to lose their competitive edge during this period, but the general growth of world prosperity masked this deterioration until the 1973 and 1979 oil price shocks sent the economy into a period of prolonged recession. In the 1980s and 1990s, the economic center of the country continued to shift northward to Flanders. Today Flanders accounts for 80% of Belgian exports.

Global trade and investment :

Principal Exports: Machinery and equipment, chemicals and pharmaceuticals, diamonds, metals and metal products, foodstuffs, plastic & rubber

Total Exports: Euros 197.1 billion in 2004. Belgium is the 10th largest exporter in the world.

Principal Imports: Machinery and equipment, chemicals, diamonds, pharmaceuticals, foodstuffs, transportation equipment, oil products

Total Imports: Euros 188.9 billion in 2004. Belgium is the 9th largest importer in the world.

Likewise investment highlights:

Foreign investment contributed significantly to Belgian economic growth in the 1960s. In particular, U.S. firms played a leading role in the expansion of light industrial and petrochemical industries in the 1960s and 1970s. The Belgian Government encourages new foreign investment as a means to promote employment. With regional devolution, Flanders, Brussels, and Wallonia are now courting potential foreign investors and offer a host of incentives and benefits.

More than 1,400 U.S. firms invested over $24 billion in Belgium by 2001. U.S. and other foreign companies in Belgium account for approximately 11% of the total work force, with the U.S. share at about 6%. U.S. companies are heavily represented in chemical, automotive assembly, and petroleum refining. A number of U.S. service industries followed in the wake of these investments--banks, law firms, public relations, accounting, and executive search firms. The resident American community in Belgium now exceeds 20,000. Attracted by the EU 1992 single-market program, many U.S. law firms and lawyers have settled in Brussels since 1989. Other foreign firms, particularly French ones, have invested locally for the same reason. Belgium has the second highest level of productivity per 4 worker in the world – second only to USA. Low cost energy and highly developed transport sector is very important in attracting investment. It has highest density of rail network in the world, 2nd largest seaport in Europe (Anwerp), 2nd largest petrochemical Centre, 5th largest Cargo airport in Europe.

Key indicators : GDP :               Euros 283 billion

                        Per Capita GDP: Euros 27,476

                        GDP Growth: 2.7 %

                        Unemployment rate: 7.8%

                        Inflation rate: 1.9%

  2003 2004
FDI inflows (extra EU-25)  Euros 2.2 billion  Euros 8.8 bn
FDI outflows (extra EU-25  Euros 7 billion  Euros 4.4 bn
Total FDI (5th highest according to UNCTAD)  $ 29 billion  

 

Major universities:

    • Brussels University

    • Catholic University of Louvain

    • Faculté Polytechnique de Mons

    • Katholieke Universiteit Leuven

    • Limburgs Universitair Centrum

    • Royal Military Academy

    • Université Libre de Bruxelles(ULB)

    • University of Antwerp

    • University of Ghent

    • University of Liège

    • University of Namur

    • Vesalius College (Vrije Universiteit Brussel)

 

Major scientific institutions:

Royal Observatory of Belgium:                   Website: www.astro.oma.be

Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences  Website: www.kbinirsnb.be

Major tourist attractions:

Grand Place, Atomium, Waterloo, Mini-Europe, Bruge, Ieper

Major newspapers/magazines/TV channels with contact details:
 

French Newspapers:
La Libre Belgique (IPM)  http://www.lalibre.be/
Le Soir (Rossel et Cie.) http://www.lesoir.be/
La Dernière Heure  http://www.dhnet.be/
Dutch Newspapers:
Brugsch Handelsblad http://www.brugschhandelsblad.be/
De Tijd (Uitgeversbedrijf Tijd) http://www.tijd.be/
De Gentenaar (VUM), Ghent http://www.gentenaar.be/
TV Channels:

Mr. Aimé Van Hecke VRT,Room 7 L 33

Canvas (VRT

Een (VRT)

Ketnet (VRT)

1043 Brussels Belgium

Tel. : + 32 2 741 35 12

e-mail : aime.vanhecke@vrt.be

  VTM

VTM Medialaan 1- 1800 Vilvoorde

02/255.32.11 hetnieuws@vtm.be

 

INDIA- BELGIUM RELATIONS

Facts of particular historical and cultural significance in relations between India

and (Belgium), including date of establishment of diplomatic relations:

India enjoys traditional, warm and friendly relations with Belgium. Trade relations go back to the 17th century when ships sailed from Ostend to Indian ports. India established diplomatic relations with Belgium in 1948 and there has been regular interaction at high levels since then.

Political relations:

India and Belgium share common values of democracy, pluralism and rule of law and are committed to multilateralism in international relations. On the political side, India’s aim is to enhance interaction at the highest political level. During the visit of EAM in September 2004 and June 2005, he held detailed discussion with his Belgian counterpart Mr. Karel de Gucht on matters of bilateral international regional importance. Foreign Secretary Mr. Shyam Saran held in-depth discussions with the Belgian side during his visit in June, 2005. In a significant development Belgium has decided to co-sponsor the G-4 Resolution on UNSC reforms.

Important Bilateral Treaties and Agreements, with brief notes:

        • Agreement on Avoidance of Double Taxation- August 1997

        • Bilateral Investment Protection Agreement signed between India and BLEU in November 1997.

        • Cultural Agreement- September , 1973

        • Air Services Agreement- April, 1967

Bilateral visits – Brief details of important two-way visits:

From India:

 Name

     Year

Finance Minister Shri Morarji Desai         1962
PM Smt. Indira Gandhi     1971
PM Shri Morarji Desai   1978
EAM Shri P V Narasimha Rao  1983
Commerce Minister Shri V P Singh  1983
Parliamentary delegation led by Speaker Shri Balram Jakhar  1988
EAM Shri I.K. Gujral  1990
Commerce Minister Shri Arun Nehru  June, 1990
Parliamentary delegation led by Speaker Shri Rabi Ray  July, 1990
EAM Shri Pranab Mukherjee  1993
EAM Shri Dinesh Singh  1994
Minister of Textiles & Labour Shri Venkat Swami  March, 1996
Commerce Minister Shri B B Ramaiah  Nov, 1996
Parliamentary delegation led by Dy Speaker Shri Suraj Bhan  May, 1997

VAT delegation from Karnataka led by Dy Chief Minister, Shri Siddaramaiah

 June, 1997
Minister of Surface Transport Shri T G Venkatraman  Sept, 1997
9th Joint Commission meeting(Com. Minister Shri PP Prabhu)  June 29, 1998
Minister of Commerce, Shri Ramakrishna Hegde  Oct, 1998
Parliamentary delegation led by Speaker Shri G.M.C. Balayogi &Dy Chairperson, RS  April, 1999
EAM Shri Jaswant Singh  Sep, 1999
Minister of State for Commerce&Industry, Shri Omar Abdullah  2-4, Feb, 2000
Chief Minister of Gujarat Shri Patel visited Antwerp  5-7, Feb, 2000
VAT delegation led by Finance Minister Mahinder Singh Saathi, NCT of Delhi  13-17, Sept, 2000
Minister of Surface Transport Rajnath Singh  24-25 Sept,2000
CM Madhya Pradesh Digvijay Singh  Jan30-2nd Feb,01
Minister for Rural Development Shri M Venkaiah Naidu,  18th July,2001
Minister (Textiles),MP Shri K P Singh,  6-12 Sept, 2001
MOS for External Affairs Shri Omar Farooq Abdullah,  14-17 Oct.,2001
6-member Parliamentary delegation, led by former Speaker Shri P A Sangma  23-26 Jan, 2002
11-Mem Joint Parl. Committee on Security del. led by Dy Speaker Shri P M Sayeed  7-8 April,2002
CM Haryana Choudhary Om Prakash Chautala  11-12 Sept, 2002
Minister for Shipping Shri Vedprakash Goyal,  24-26 Oct.2002
Minister HRD Shri Murli Manohar Joshi,  10-12 Nov.,2002
MOS for Tourism (Assam) Smt Ajanta Neog,  19-20 Nov.2002
Karnataka Minister for Transport B Ramanath Rai  6-8 Feb., 2003
Former Prime Minister, Shri I K Gujral  4-7 March,2003
Minister of Environment and Forests Shri T R Baalu  8-10, April,2003
Minister of Communications, IT, and Disinvestment Shri Arun Shouri  21-24 May,2003
Karnataka Minister for IT and Tourism, Shri D B Inamdar  11-13 Sept.,2003
EAM Shri Yashwant Sinha  27-29 Oct,2003  
EAM Shri Natwar Singh  12-15, Sept,2004
Parliamentary Delegation led by Shri Rup Chand Pal, MP for the Parl. Conf. on WTO  24-26, Nov,2004
MOS(PMO) Shri Prithviraj Chavan, accompanied by 4-MPs to attend the Third International Conference on Federalism(March 3-5, 2005)  3-5, March,2005
EAM Sh. K.Natwar Singh for Iraq Conf and G-4 Ministerial Meeting  20-21 June2005


From Belgium:

 Name

 Year

King Baudoin in 1970  1970
Minister of Foreign Trade Mr. H. De Bruyne in 1978  1978
Foreign Minister Mr. Leo Tindemans in 1982  1982
Secretary of State for Foreign Trade, Mr. Kempenaire in 1983  1983
Speaker Mr. Ferdinand Nothomb in 1993  1993
HRH Prince Philippe & Foreign Trade Minister Mr. Robert Urbain - 8th JCM  March, 1995
Walloon Parliamentary delegation led by President Spitaels  Sept.,1996
Foreign Minister Mr. Erik Derycke  Feb.,1997
Queen Fabiola, spouse of late King Baudoin, for the funeral of Mother Teresa  Sept,1997
Prime Minister Jean-Luc Dehaene  30th Oct-3Nov,97
Flemish Minister for Transport and Public Works, Mr. Eddy Baldewijns led a port delegation  Jan 27-Feb7,1998
HRH Crown Prince and Dy PM & Minister for Foreign Trade Elio Di Rupo trade delegation  21-29 Nov.,1998
Flemish Min. for Environment and Employment Theo Kelchtermans led a 21-mem. trade del  13-21 March,99
State Secretary for F.Affairs, Ms. Annemie Neyts-Uyttebroeck, with BLEU Jt. Commission  8-12 Jan,2001
PM Guy Verhofstadt &Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Ms. Annemie NeytsUyttebroeck  22-23 Nov.2001
Senate Finance and Economic Commission delegation led by Senator Jean Marie de Decker  

Jan 14-24,2005

HRH Crown Prince Philippe led 285-member Economic Mission to India  March 12-19,05

 

Commercial and Economic Relations, with trade, aid and investment details:

Commercial and Economic relations are governed by Agreement on Economic, Industrial, Scientific and Technological Cooperation between BLEU and India in March 1990 and other EU and WTO Agreements. Belgium has emerged India’s second largest trade partners within EU with bilateral trade in 2004 at 6.49 billion euros, 75% of which is in diamonds. India’s aim is to diversify bilateral trade which is dominated by diamonds to areas of information and communication technology, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology where there is a tremendous potential for synergy. A delegation from Belgium led by the Chairman of the Senate Finance Commission visited India in January 2004 to study India’s economic and financial policies. At the popular level Belgium, but more so Antwerp, is known as the world’s diamond trade centre to which the Indian community based there has contributed greatly.

The liberalization of the Indian economy in the 1990s aroused Belgian interest in India. The initial interest translated into an increasing number of official and business visits to India in recent years. Crown Prince Philippe led three economic missions to India(1995,1998, 2005). The visits generated enormous interest on either side resulting in several viable deals in the form of joint ventures and technology tie-ups. According to the Secretariat for Industrial Assistance(SIA) Belgium’s total investment approvals into India for the period 1991- Sep.,2004 touched a record figure of Rs. 46,402.5 million (approx. US $ 1.2 billion), with 1998 being a particularly good year account for about 80% of this amount. The actual investment flows for this period, however, have not kept pace with the approvals. There are an estimated 231 joint ventures, most in the small and medium 8 category. Belgium Company Tractabael is the largest investor. BARCO and BEKAERT are established in India for many decades. During the 2005 visit of the Economic Mission, 5 MoUs were signed. CII signed 3 MOUs with Belgian companies Agoria, VBO, Flanders Institute of Logistics. IBA Pharma of Belgium and MK Ali Manekia, a non-resident Indian signed MoU for research and development activities in the health sector. IBA Molecular Imaging signed the MoU with Indian Diagnostic Laboratories of Dewang Chand Agrawal for Molecular Research.

Major items of Indian exports to Belgium are iron & steel products, minerals fuels, oils and products thereof, apparels and clothing accessories, organic chemicals, fishery products, man made staple fibres, electrical machinery etc. Major items of imports to India from Belgium are precious stones and metals, boilers, machinery and mechanical appliances, iron & steel products, pharmaceuticals, organic chemicals, plastic & its products, electrical machinery & equipments, photographic & cinematography equipments, measuring equipment, wood pulp etc. In the case of investment, some Indian companies have acquired business in Belgium. Matrix India took over Docpharma; Crompton Greaves India acquired Pauwels Group and Jubilant of India took over PSI.

S&T Relations, cooperation in other fields such as Railways, Space, IT,

Biotechnology, Infrastructure, Mining etc:

A Belgian software and satellite manufacturing company Verhaert signed a contract with ISRO in April, 1998 for launching a 100 kg satellite through PSLV-C3 in the year 2000. The satellite was subsequently launched successfully from Sriharikota in August, 2001. This is the first time that an European company has ever come to a commercial agreement with ISRO for launching low orbit Satellites. An MOU for cooperation in space technology was signed between ISRO and the Techspace Aero during the Belgian Crown Prince’s visit in November, 1998. A seminar on cooperation in space sector and space related technologies was held in Bangalore during the visit of Crown Prince Philippe of Belgium in March, 2005. Belgian companies are participating in EU’s Galileo project with which India is negotiating a cooperation agreement.

Chairs in Universities on Indian Studies, South Asian Studies, etc., and vice versa in Indian Universities, relevant Area Studies’ Centres in the two countries:

 

SUBJECT  UNIVERSITY
India Study Centre established in 1996 University of Antwerp
Optional Course on Modern Indian Studies commenced in February 2003 Katholiek University, Leuven
Hindi Chair, November 2004 Ghent University

 

Cultural Troupes – Incoming and Outgoing over last few years:

From India

A bilateral Cultural Agreement was signed with Belgium in September, 1973. A Cultural Exchange Programme(CEP) covering the years 1996-98 was signed with the Flemish Community in March, 1996. An India Study Centre was set up in Antwerp in 1996. There is a school of Indian classical music in Brussels and that of Indian classical dance in Ghent, both run by Belgian artists. Many Indian artists, even outside the CEP, visit Belgium. Embassy is planning an important cultural event in 2006 focusing on India’s diverse and 9 composite culture. Under CEP, an India-based ICCR –sponsored professor is currently teaching Hindi at the Belgian University of Ghent. Several Indian students are studying in Belgian universities, under scholarships provided by the Flemish/Belgian governments. The following ICCR sponsored troupes have performed in Belgium.

 

Pandit Ravi Shankar
Pandit Jasraj
Shri Kelucharan Mohapatra
Ustad Amjad Ali Khan
27-29 March, 2003 3-Member Instrumental Sarod Group led by Shri Abhijit Roy Choudary
31st May-2nd June, 2003 10-member Dhwani Kathak group led by Mrs. Vaswati Mishra
11-12 June, 2003 4-member Hindustani vocal group led by Shri R. Fahimuddin Khan Dagar
4-6 October, 2003 11-Member Dance and Music Group of Rabindra Bharati University led by Dr. Gauri Bhattacharya
25.4.04 Ms. Lalitha Shankar, reputed Sculptor held a solo exhibition of sculptures
10-13 June, 2004

4-member Rabindra Sangeet Singer  group led by Shri Kamal Kanti Gupta

 

Students Exchange Programme:

The Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR), New Delhi, offers three scholarships at the post-graduation levels to the Belgians. Similarly, the Ministry of Flemish Community, Administration of the Higher Education and Scientific Research offers three scholarships to the Indian students. These exchanges have been going on regularly between the two countries.

A number of students on self-financing basis are also studying in the University of Gent, University of Antwerp and University of Leuven.

Sister City relations with India:

There is a proposal for twinning of the cities of Antwerp & Surat.

Important streets, public places named after Indian leaders:

A Gandhi statue is installed in Parc Marie Jose, Molenbeck, St. Jean, Brussels where every year Gandhi Jayanti is held with participation by the local Mayor and Indian community. City of Antwerp has a street named after Mahatma Gandhi. There is a proposal for installation of Mahatma Gandhi bust in Antwerp.

Types of visas issued, and visa details for officials, students, business people, tourists, etc. from India:

There are two main types of visa: (1) Schengen visa 2) short-term (tourist or business) or so-called C visa, and (3) long-term (student, family reunification or immigration) or socalled D visa. Before applying for a visa, the applicant has to submit an invitation letter, proof of sufficient financial means (or a pledge of financial support by a Belgian national), proof of air ticket reservation and accommodation and, if possible, other supporting documents (such as a rough itinerary in case of tourist visa.) If pledge of financial support is shown, make sure that guarantor has enough financial means to make it valid, and that this private person also provides you with the documents that prove this (such as salary or bank statements for instance). The applicant may also be requested to supply other supporting 10 documents. Most documents will have to be originals, duly legalized by the competent authorities. For more information contact Belgian Embassy, New Delhi at: http://www.diplomatie.be/newdelhi/

Air links with India/Convenient Travel Routes:

The approved route between India and Brussels is:

Delhi – Frankfurt(Air India) – Brussels (by foreign carrier)

Delhi- Paris-Brussels

Delhi- London-Brussels

Delhi-Paris(by air) and Paris-Brussels (by train)

Jet Airways is expected to start its operations very soon and will fly flights from India to

Brussels directly.

Indian Banks:

 

Bank of Baroda, Brussels , 28 Rue de la Loi, 1040 Brussels

Tel : 02 : 285 00 40 ; Fax : 02-285 00 47

State bank of India, Antwerpen, Korte Herentalsestraat 3 lange, Herentalsestraat 62/70, 2018, Antwerp

03-233 23 55 ; Fax : 03-232 43 70

Addresses of branch offices of other Indian Government and Public Sector organizations, Chambers of Commerce etc., such as Tourist Office, Export Promotion Councils, FICCI, CII, ASSOCHEM, etc:

AIR INDIA BRUSSELS

60, Rue Ravenstein 1000 Brussels  59 96, TEL: 02-512 75 15, FAX: 02-514

NAME & DESIGNATION OFFICE
Mr.Van Hoorickx Luc Sales Manager (B&L) 02-512 92 83; 512 90 01 ; 512 75 15
Mobile:0475-30 12 95 e-mail:lucvanhoorickx@hotmail.com
Ms. Nadia Koujane Reservation Desk 02-512 75 15

 

Link to Embassy and Consulate websites:

www.indembassy.be

Estimated NRI/PIO population:

There are about 7,000 persons of Indian origin in Belgium. Indian Communities are mainly in Antwerp and Brussels. There are about 250 families engaged in diamond trade in Antwerp. Many of the other Indians living in Belgium are professionals employed with either multinational companies or other professional organizations.

Important NRI/PIO Associations and their contact details:

There are more than 10 Indian associations. The leading ones are Bhartiya Samaj, Antwerp Indian Association.

  Name & address of NRI/PIO Designation & Association's name   Office Address Tel/Fax/GSM/Email
1. Mr. Sunil Prasad President
GOPIO
69 Boulevard Louis
Mettewie, Bte 18,
1080 Brussels
02-2240203 (O)
02/469.2677 (R)
02-2015815 (Fax)
sunil.prasad@coditel.net
2. Mr. Shashank Sapre Regional Director,
Bharat Darshan European Indian Association
Romelaan 31,
B-2400 Mol,
Belgium
014-703030
014-703232
014-703434 (Fax)
0496-360100 (GSM)
sapre@multitrade.be
3. Mr. M.S. Chandramouli Vice President,
Bharat Darshan
European
Indian
Association
Chemin du Tilleul 3,
4020 Wandre
0496.33.21.00 (GSM)
chandra@skynet.be
4. Mr. Vipin Mehra Vice-President
Bharatiya
Samaj
Rue Coleau 14
1410 Waterloo
02-387 3838(Tel/Fax)
0477 97 52 19 (GSM)
Vipin.mehra@skynet.be
5. Mr. Kaushik Mehta Eekhoornlaan 25,
2610 Wilrijk
President
Antwerp India
Association
(AIA) &
Chairman,
Indo-Belge
Diamantaires
Association
(IBDA)
Eurostar Diamond
Traders NV
Hoveniersstraat 2,
2018 Antwerpen
03 449 45 20 (R)
03 213 77 77 (O)
03 213 77 99 (Fax)
0475 49 55 55 (GSM)
KMEHTA1@ibm.net
6. Mr. Mukund Joshi
Ferd
Verbiestlaan 1
2650 Edegem
President,
Bharat Darshan
European
Indian
Association and
Board Member,
IBDA
Belindiam NV
Hoveniersstraat 30,
2018 Antwerpen
03 448 04 61 (R)
03 233 95 61 (O)
03 226 21 50 (Fax)
0477 66 54 06 (GSM)
joshi@pandora.be
7. Mr. Ramesh Patel
Belgielei 170,
B5,
2018
Antwerpen
Antwerp India
Association
Mishal BVBA
Hoveniersstraat 2,
2018 Antwerpen
03-226 1217 (O)
03 2301866 (R)
03-2260127 (Fax)
0475-270702 (GSM)
8. Mr. Dilip Mehta
Fruithoflaan
124
2600 Berchem
Antwerp India
Association
Rosy Blue NV,
Hoveniersstr 53, 12th Floor
2018 Antwerp
03 206 1610
0486222010 (GSM)
9. Mr. Mehul Kothari
Belgielei 30, 2018
Antwerpen
Antwerp India Association and Co-opted Member, IBDA Sushang Export BVBA Hoveniersstraat 2, 2018 Antwerpen 03 2302669 (R)
03 231 04 04 (O)
03 225 22 34 (Fax)
0475 45 04 04 (GSM)

cocolime77@hotmail.com
10. Mr. Manoj Mehta Antwerp India Association and Co-opted Member, IBDA Sur Jewel NV Hoveniersstraat 2, 2018 Antwerpen 03 233 24 20 (O)
03 231 89 34 (Fax)
surjewel@vt4.net
11. Mr. Bharat Shah Mezenlaan 4 2610 Wilrijk Antwerp India Association and Co-opted Member, IBDA Diampex BVBA Schupstr.1-7, 2018 Antwerpen 03 448 23 29 (R)
03 232 60 25 (O)
03 226 50 55 (Fax)
0475 49 3161 (GSM)
diampex@hotmail.com
12. Mr. Chetan Choksi Sorbenlaan 10 2610 Wilrijk Antwerp India Association Diminco NV Hoveniersstraat 30, 2018 Antwerpen 03 830 20 00 (R)
03 226 27 28 (O)
03 226 00 23 (Fax)
0475 27 77 78 (GSM)
Choksi@diminco.be
13. Mr. Vijay Shah Acacialaan 25 2020 Antwerpen Antwerp India Association Vijaydimon BVBA Pelikaanstraat 62, 2018 Antwerpen 03 828 9591 (R)
03 203 0596 (O)
03 233 9838 (Fax)
0476 4356 30 (GSM)
vijaydimon@pandora.be
14. Mr. Sailesh C.Mehta Groenenborgerlaan 65, 2610 Wilrijk Antwerp IndiaAssociation Diamond CuttersAntwerp NV Hoveniersstraat 53, 2018 Antwerpen 03 830 59 12 (R)
03 231 53 50 (O)
03 231 00 32 (Fax)
0475 75 95 96 (GSM)
mehta65@hotmail.com

 

Major Indian ethnic papers/TV channels with contact details:

There are no Indian ethnic papers or TV channels in Brussels. But the following Indian journalists are stationed in Brussels:

JOURNALISTS IN BRUSSELS

NAME & DESIGNATION TELEPHONE & E-MAIL FAX ADDRESS
Mr. Batuk Gathani The Hindu 02-381 16 15 100602.47@compuserve.com 02-381 16 30 13, Av. des Martins Pecheurs, 1640 Rhode St.Genese
Mr. Malcom Subhan Financial Express 02- 230 81 22 m.subhan@eias.org 02-230 54 02 18, Kistebeldlaan 3080 Tervuren
Mr.Jitendra Joshi Agence France Press 02- 230 83 94 jitendra.joshi@afp.com

02- 230 23 04

 

 

17/3 Rue Archimede 1000 Brussels
Mr. Nawab Khan Bureau Chief-Brussels Islamic Republic News Agency 02- 660 16 89 025258@skynet.be 02- 660 43 69  

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