The Indian Analyst
 

South Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Preface

Introduction

Text of the Inscriptions

Chalukyas

Kalachuris

Yadavas

Hoysalas

Kadambas

Sindas

Vijayanagara Kings

Muslim Rulers

Marathas

The East India Company

Miscellaneous Inscriptions

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

BOMBAY-KARNATAKA INSCRIPTIONS

THE CHALUKYAS

Somesvara IV | Somesvara I | Somesvara II | Vikramaditya VI

  Somesvara III  | Jagadekamalla | Taila III  

No.67

(B.K. No. 55 of 1926-27)

LAKKUNDI, GADAG TALUK, DHARWAR DISTRICT

On a slab built into the roof of the Ganesa shrine near the Girl’s School

Somesvara IV, 1185 A.D.

The inscription contains two dates.  One is the fourth regnal year of the king, Visvavasu, Pushya su. 2, Wednesday, corresponding to 1185 A.D., December 25.  The other is Pushya su. 8, Sunday in the same year.  The tithi corresponds to 1185 A.D., December 31, the weekday being Tuesday.

On the first date are registered, amount others, gifts made for the worship of the god in the Nompiya Basadi, and for burning a lamp before the deity Kammatesvara at Lokkigundi.  On the second date are recorded a series of donations made for the worship of the deity Santinatha in Kammata-jinalaya by several members of the artisan community of the same place.  The gifts were made in the presence of the One Thousand Mahajanas, all the Goles and Go-Brahmanas of Lokkigundi which is said to be an agrahara created by Sri-Rama.

No.68

(B.K. No. 221 of 1926-27)

ABBIGERI, RON TALUK, DHARWAR DISTRICT

Slab set up in front of the village chavadi

Somesvara IV, 1186 A.D.

This is dated the 4th regnal year of the king, Visvavasu, Phalguna-amavasya, [Monday], the tithi corresponding to 1186 A.D., March 22.  The week day, however, was Saturday.

In refers to Bijjana and Vikramaditya, the Sinda subordinates of the king, as governing the country and mentions Abbeyagere (modern Abbigeri).  It records a gift of land made by Vikramaditya for worship and offerings to the god Kuppesvara presumably at Abbeyagere mentioned at the beginning of the inscription.  The epigraph is much damaged.

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No.69

(B.K. No. 112 of 1926-27)

HOSUR, GADAG TALUK, DHARWAR DISTRICT

On a wall to the right of entrance into the Trikutesvara temple

Somesvara IV, 1186 A.D.

The record is dated the 3rd regnal year of the king, Plavanga, Ashadha su. 5, Monday.  The details regularly correspond to 1186 A.D., June 23, Monday, for the previous cyclic year Prabhava and not for Plavanga.

It registers a gift of rice made out of his wages by the carpenter Kalloja for the offerings to the god Morakesvara.  Agastya-muni, the priest of the temple, wasthe recipient of the gift.

No.70

(B.K. No. 48 of 1926-27)

LAKKUNDI, GADAG TALUK, DHARWAR DISTRICT

On a beam in the Nannesvara temple

Somesvara IV, 1186 A.D.

This is dated Saka 1108, Parabhava, Pushya su. 13, Thursday, Uttarayana-samkranti, corresponding to 1186 A.D., December 25, Thursday, f.d.t. 07.

It records a gift of five panas out of the income from minting operations, made by the Anikara Sankara Setti, son of Bandiya Basavisetti, for worship in the temple of Nannesvara. 

No.71

(B.K. No. 83 of 1928-29)

KONNUR, BILGI PETHA, BIJAPUR DISTRICT

On a broken slab set up near the village chavadi.

Somesvara IV, 1188 A.D.

The record mentions Chalukya-pratapa-Chakravarthi and is dated the cyclic year Kilaka, Asvayuja ba.  1, Friday.  In the later period of the Chalukya regime the details correspond only to 1188 A.D., October 7, Friday, f.d.t.,  38, when Somesvara IV was reigning.  The record may therefore be assigned to this king.

It records a gift of toll incomes on certain articles.  The inscription is damaged and the details are lost.

No.72

(B.K. No. 196 of 1928-29)

ANNIGERI, NAVALGUND TALUK, DHARWAR DISTRICT

On a slab set up in front of the Banasankari temple

Somesvara IV, 1186-88 A.D.

The inscription bears two dates : (1) 5th regnal year of the king, Parabhava, which corresponds to 1186-87 A.D. (2)6th regnal year of the king, Plavanga, correspondting to 1187-88 A.D. It is not possible to give the precise equivalents of the dates, as the details are lost.

It records, on the first date, the remission of tax on the lands of the Brahmanas in the five Brahmapuris of Annigere made by Dandanayaka Kesirajayaa, the Perggade of Belvala-nadu, who was an officer of Ballaya-Sahani, in the presence of the Karanas, Trivargasamaya and the body of One Thousand.  It records on the second-date another gift made to the Brahmanas of Brahmapuri by Pattanadhipati  Hadavala Basavayya.  It describes the genealogy of the Chalukya kings and mentions Bammideva, Lingadeva, Vishnu-dandanatha, Raya-dandanatha and other officers.  Annigere is praised as the crest jewel of the province of Eradarunuru.  Most of the composition is in Kannada, but a few Sanskrit verses are also inserted.  The record is damaged and many passages are worn out.

No.73

(B.K. No. 145 of 1926-27)

HOMBAL, GADAG TALUK, DHARWAR DISTRICT

On a slab set up in the temple of  Sankaralinga

Somesvara IV, 1189 A.D.

The record is dated the 3rd regnal year of the king, Saumya, Sravana su. 10, Monday, Sankramana.  The date corresponds to 1189 A.D., July 24.  But there was no Sankramana on that day.  The regnal year cited would yield 1187 A.D., as the initial year of the king which is rather too late.

It registers a gift of land made by the teacher Rudrasakti of  the Kalamukha order after purchasing it from the One Hundred and Twenty Mahajanas of Pombulcha for worship and offerings in the temple of Kumara-Bontesvara constructed by him in the agrahara of Pombolal in memory of his preceptor Vamasakti.  The record describes a line of teachers of the Kalamukha sect in the Belleya-santana and Parvata-vali as follows : Bonteyamuni to whom are attributed several miracles one of which is said to have been performed in the court of Jayasimha-Chakravarti. His chief disciple was Avadhuta who had the following junior colleagues, Kedarasakti, Mallikarjuna, Murujavi, Nirvanayogi, Vamadeva or Vamasakti, Siddhesvara, Rudrasakti and Kriyasakti.  Vamasakti had three disciples, viz., Bonteyaguru, Mallikarjuna, and Rudrasakti, the donor.  Various other gifts made to the same deity on the same occasion by the local artists.  Aruvattokkalu, merchants, etc., are also recorded.  Pombulcha and Pombolal occurring in the inscription are the earlier forms of the name of Hombal.  The epigraph is also interesting on account of its literary merit.

No.74

(B.K. No. 5 of  27-28)

KODIKOPPANAGUDDA, RON TALUK, DHARWAR DISTRICT

On a slab leaning against the wall to the left of entrance Into the central shrine of Kalakalesvara

Somesvara IV, 1194 A.D.

This is dated the 10th regnal year of the king, Prajapati, Karttika-punnami, Monday.  The date is irregular including the wrong citation of the cyclic year.  The 10th year of  the king coincides with Ananda, when the details regularly correspond to 1194 A.D., October 1, Monday.  On this day there was a lunar eclipse which is not mentioned in the record. 

It registers a gift of land by the king’s subordinate Mahamandalesvara Achideva for offerings, etc., in the temple of Kalakalesvara.  The genealogical succession of the donot is given as follows :  Acharsa I, his son Bammarasa, the former’s brother Singa’s son, Acharsa II, (his son) Chavunda and (his son) Achideva.  It becomes thus evident that this Achideva belonged to the Sinda family of he Erambarage branch.  Cf. Epiraphia Indica, Vol. XX, p. 114.

No.75

(B.K. No. 192 of 1926-27)

KODIKOP, RON TALUK, DHARWAR DISTRICT

On the fragment of a stone set up near the front wall of the Mula Brahmsvara temple

Somesvara IV

After the king’s prasasti his feudatory of the Sinda family is described.   The name of this chief, the date and other details are lost.  It seems to record a gift of land as gathered from the mention of the boundaries in the obliterated portion.  The epigraph is badly worn out.

No.76

(B.K. No. 32 of 1928-29)

ARASIBIDI, HUNGUND TALUK, BIJAPUR DISTRICT

On a stone leaning against the wall of the Hanuman temple

Somesvara IV

This record refers itself to the reign of Somesvara IV who is associated with the title trailokyamalla, evidently after his father Taila III.  It then introduces S. I.I. , Vol. XV-27.

Sinda subordinate whose name is lost.  The inscription is baldy damaged andmany other details including the date are obliterated.

No.77

(B.K. No. 86 of 1928-29)

KONNUR, BILI PETHA, BIJAPUR DISTRICT

On a broken stone standing in the temple of Hanuman

Somesvara IV

The epigraph gives the genealogy of the Chalukya family from Vikramaditya VI and refers itself to the reign of Somesvara IV.  It then introduces his feudatory brothers Vira Bijjala and Vira Vikrama of the Sinda family, whose ancestry also is described .  It also narrates the forbears of the king’s minister and general Terjiraja of the Gautama gotra.  He was son of Bhayila, grandson of Tejaraja and great-grandson of Nannapayya.  The rest of the inscription giving the details of date and gift is entirely obliterated in Sanskrit. 

No.78

(B.K. No. 6 of 1930-31)

HULBENCHI, BAGEVADI TALUK, BIJAPUR DISTRICT

On a slab set up in front of the temple of Hanuman

Somesvara IV

This record refers itself to the reign of Somesvara IV whose victory over his adversaries including the Kalachuris is described.  It then introduces the king’s subordinate Kumara Bammarasa-dandanatha who is credited in a lengthy prasasti with victory over the Hoysalas, the Cholas of Velnadu and the king of Malava.  The epigraph is broken and the other details are lost.

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