The Indian Analyst
 

South Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Preface

Text of the Inscriptions

Part I    -Sanskrit Inscription

Part II  -Tamil & Grantha Ins.

Part III -Notes & Fragments

Part IV  -Addenda

Other Inscriptions

Tamil Inscriptions

Misc. Ins. from Tamil Country

Chola Inscriptions

Kannada Inscriptions

Telugu Ins. from Andhra Pradesh

Pallava Inscriptions

Pandya Inscriptions

Ins. of Vijayanagara Dynasty

Ins. during 1903-1904

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

PART-II

TAMIL AND GRANTHA INSCRIPTIONS

II. INSCRIPTIONS IN THE NEIGHBOURHOOD OF VELUR

NO.43. ON A STONE AT ARAPPAKKAM NEAR VELUR

This and the next-following seven inscriptions record grants to Jvarakhandesvara-svamin of Velur, i.e. to the Vellore Temple, which is nowadays called Jalakanthesvara[1].  The name of the temple is spelt Jvarakandesvara in five inscriptions, Jvarakanthesvara in two others and Jvarakandhesvara in one of them.  The Sanskrit original of these various forms seems to have been Jvarakhandesvara.  Jvarakhanda, “the destroyer of fever,” would be a synonym of Javarahara, which is applied to Siva in the name of one of the Kanchipuram temples.[2]

The inscriptions Nos.43 to 46 are dated on the same of the Akshya year, which was current after the expiration of the Saka year 1488, and during the reign of Sadasiva-deva-maharaja, They record grants which were made to the Vellore Temple at the request of Sinna-Bommu-nayaka of Velur by the mahamandalesvara Tirumalaiyadeva-maharaja, also called Tirumalai-rajayan, (the younger brother of) Ramaraja, with the consent of Sadasiva-Deva-maharayar.

The historical results obtained from these four inscriptions are:-

1. That Sadasiva-deva of Vijayanagara was still alive in 1566-67 A.D., i.e., ten years after the latest grant mentioned in my second paper on the Karnata Dynasty.[3]

2. That, after the death of his elder brother Rama, Tirumala-raja of Karnata[4] continued to acknowledge the king of Vijayanagara as his sovereign and submitted to the title of mahamandalesvara.

3. The Sinna-Bommu-nayaka of the four inscriptions is perhaps identical with “Bommi Reddi or Naidu,” to whom tradition assigns the foundation of the Vellore Temple.[5]

The Vilapaka grant of Venkata I. of Karnata dated Saka 1523 mentions a certain Linga-bhupala, son of Veluri-Bomma-nripati and grandson of Virappa-nayaka-kshamapa.[6] Velluri-Bomma is evidently the same as Sinna-Bommu-nayaka of Velur.  From the title “Prince” , which the Vilapaka grant attributes to Bomma and to his father and son, it follows that his family were petty chiefs under the kings of Karnataka, who were again nominally dependent on the kings of Vijayanagara.

The inscription No.43, as mentioned in Sewell’ Lists of Antiquities,[7] records the gift of the village of Arapakkam, where it is still found.

TRANSLATION

Let there be prosperity ! Hail ! After Sinna-Bommu-nayaka (of) Velur had made a petition to the illustrious mahamandalesvara Ramaraja-Tirumalaiya-deva-maharaja, - Tirumalai-rajayan, having made a petition at the feet of Sadasiva-deva-maharayar, gave the village of Arappakkam to (the temple of) Jvarakandesvara-svamin (at) Velur for (providing) all kinds of enjoyments,[8] on Wednesday the twelfth lunar day of the latter half of the month of Kumbha of the Akshaya-sainvatsara, which was current after the Saka year 1488 (had passed), while the illustrious Sadasiva-deva-maharayar was pleased to rule the earth.

(Line 21.) “of a gift and protection, protection is more meritorious than a gift ; by a gift one obtains (only) heaven, by protection the eternal abode.”

NO.44. ON A STONE AT ARIYUR NEAR VELUR

The object of the grant is “the village of Murukkeri-Sirreri within (the boundaries of) Arugur,” i.e., of the modern Ariyur.

NO.45. ON A STONE AT ARUMBARITTI NEAR VELUR

The object of the grant is the village of Arumbaritti.

NO.46. ON A STONE AT SADUPPERI NEAR VELUR

The object of the grant is the village of Sadupperi.

NO.47. ON A STONE AT SATTUVACHCHERI NEAR VELUR

This and the next-following two inscriptions are dated on the same day of the Yuva year, which was current after expiration of the Saka year 1497, and during the reign of the mahamandalesvara Sriranga-deva-maharayar.  They record grants to the Vellore Temple, which were made at the request of Sinna-Bommu-nayaka of Velur by Krishnappa-nayaka Ayyan, with the consent of Sriranga-deva-maharayar.

The Sriranga-deva mentioned in Nos. 47 to 49 is Srirangaraya I. of Karnata, of whom we have copper-plate grant of Saka 1497 and 1506[9] An inscription of his tributary Krishnappa-nayaka dated Saka 1500 has been translated by Mr.Rice.[10] On Sinua-Bommu-nayaka of Velur, see the introduction of No.43.

The inscription No.47 records the gift of the village of Sattuvachcheri, where it is still found.

TRANSLATION

Let there be prosperity ! Hail ! After Sinna-Bommu-nayaka (of) Velur had made a petition at the feet of Sriranga-deva-maharayar, gave the village of Sattuvachcheri to (the temple of) Jvarakandhesvara-svamin (at) Velur for (providing) all kinds of enjoyments, on Wednesday the thirteenth lunar day of the dark half of the month of Makara of the Yuva-Samvatsara, which was current after the Saka year 1497 (had passed), while the illustrious mahamandalesvara Sriranga-deva-maharayar was pleased to rule the earth.

(Line 22.) “of a gift and protection,” etc.[11] Let there be prosperity !

NO.48. ON A STONE AT SAMANGINELLUR NEAR VELUR

The object of the grant is the village of Senbaga-Perumal-nallu, i.e., the modern Samanginellur.


[1] North Arcot Mannual, p. 189.

[2] Sewell’s Lists of Antiquities, Vol.I, p.180.

[3] Ind. Ant.,Vol. XIII, p.154.

[4] Loc. Cit., p.155.

[5] North Arcot Mannual, p.188.  In the Velai-managar-charitram (printed at Velur in the Dhalu year, i.e., A.D. 1876) he is called Bommaiy-Reddiyar.

[6] Ind. Ant., Vol. XIII, p.127.

[7] Vol. I., p.165.

[8] Angarangavaibhavam is a synonym of angarangavaibhogam , which occurs in Nos.47 and 48 and means according to Winslow, “all worldly enjoyments.”

[9] Ind. Ant. Vol.XIII, p.155.

[10] Mysore Inscription, p.220.

[11] See the translation of No.43.

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