The Indian Analyst
 

South Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Preface

Text of the Inscriptions

Part I    -Sanskrit Inscription

Part II  -Tamil & Grantha Ins.

Part III -Notes & Fragments

Part IV  -Addenda

Other Inscriptions

Tamil Inscriptions

Misc. Ins. from Tamil Country

Chola Inscriptions

Kannada Inscriptions

Telugu Ins. from Andhra Pradesh

Pallava Inscriptions

Pandya Inscriptions

Ins. of Vijayanagara Dynasty

Ins. during 1903-1904

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

PART-II

TAMIL AND GRANTHA INSCRIPTIONS

V. - INSCRIPTIONS AT PADAVEDU

NO.78. ON THE EAST AND NORTH BASES OF THE AMMALAPPESVARA TEMPLE

This inscription is dated in the year, which was current after the expiration of the Saka year 1180, and records a grant, which Rajagambhira-Sambuvarayan made to the temple of Ammaiappesvara.  The name of the object of the grant must be contained in the final portion of the first line, which is buried underground.  The donor is evidently identical with that Rajagambhira-Sambuvarayan, who is mentioned in a Tirumalai inscription (No.74), which seems to be dated in Saka 1157-58.  It may be further conjectured, that the Ammaiappesvara Temple at Padavedu had received its name from Ammaiappan or Ammaiyappan, one of the birudas of another Sambuvarayan, who was a contemporary and probably a relation of Rajagambhira-Sambuvarayan.

TRANSLATION

Hail! Prosperity! To-day, which is (the day of the nakshatra) Revati and Monday, the seventh lunar day of the former half of the month of Karkataka, which was current after the Saka year one thousand one hundred and eighty (had passed),-I, Rajagambhira-sambuvaraya[n] gave to the god, who is the lord of the Ammaiappesvara (temple), as a divine gift . . . . . excluding the divine gifts to the various temples (at) Elur, including . . . the tax for the village-accountant, the tax on Uvachchas, the tax on Ajivakas, the tax on looms, the tax on goldsmiths, . . . . . the tax on oil-mills, . . . . . (and) the paddy for the Vetti.

No.79. ON THE SOUTH WALL OF THE AMMAIAPPESVARA TEMPLE

This inscription is dated during the reign of Vira-Devaraya-maharayar (of Vijayanagara) and in the Pramadin year (i.e., Saka 1356). It records a grant to the Ammaiappa Temple.  The name of the donor is obliterated.

TRANSLATION

Hail! On the tenth day of the month of Masi of the Pramadicha[1] year, which was current (during the reign) of the illustrious rajadhiraja rajaparamesvara, the illustrious Vira-Devaraya-maharayar, . . . . . I valavu was given by a dharmasasana to the lord Ammaiappa-nayanar. This meritorious gift shall last as long as the moon and the sun.  He who shall injure this meritorious gift, [shall incur the sin of one has killed] a black cow on the bank of the Ganga.

No.80. ON THE SOUTH WALL OF THE AMMAIPPESVARA TEMPLE

This inscription is dated during the reign of Vira-Devaraya-maharayar (of  Vijayanagara) and in the Ananda year.  (i.e.,Saka 1357).  It records the gift of a village to the Ammaiappa Temple.  The middle portion is defaced by three cracks.

TRANSLATION

Hail! On the 2nd day of the month of Adi on the Ananda year, which was current (during the reign) of the illustrious maharajadhiraja rajaparamesvara, the illustrious Vira-Devaraya-maharayar, I, Ulagananda-Vel Suryadeva, gave (the village of )

[Sa]lavaipparru by a dharmasasana to the lord Ammaiappa-nayanar.  Accordingly (there follows) the signature (?) of Mullaya-rayan Vengada.

NO.81. ON THE EAST WALL OF THE SOMANATHESVARA TEMPLE

This inscription is dated in the Suka year, which was current after the expiration of the Saka year 1371, and during the reign of Virapratapa Praudha-Immadi-Devaraya-maharayar.  This is the latest hitherto-known date of Devaraja II.  In the preservedportion, mention is made of the kingdom of Padaividu (Padaivitttu rajyam),which belonged to Tondai-mandalam, of the right and left had castes[2] and of the Somanathesvara Temple at Padaividu.

TRANSLATION

Let there be prosperity! Hail! On the day of (the nakshatra) Uttiradam,[3] which corresponds to the Yoga Ayushmat and to Saturday, the thirteenth lunar day of the former half of the month of Simha of the Sukla year, which was current after the Saka year 1371 (had passed), while theillustrious mahamandalesvara, the conqueror of hostile kings, the destroyer of those kings who break their word, the destroyer of the three kings (of the South), who takens every country which he sees, but who never gives back a country which he has taken, the lord of the eastern, southern, western and northern oceans, the illustrious rajadhiraja rajaparamesvara, the illustrious Virapratapa, who has been pleased to the hunting of elephants, Praudha-Immadi-Devaraya-maharayar, was pleased to rule the earth,-the inhabitants of the kingdom (rajyam) of Padaividu, (which belongs) to Tondai-mandalam, the great men of the right hand and of the left hand,-at the temple of Somanathesvara-nayanar, the lord (of) Padaividu in the north-west (of) Muruga-mangala-parru, which borders on the Rajagambhira Hill (Rajagambhiran-malai)[4] . . . . . .


[1] As Dr.Oppert has shown in the Madras Journal of Literature and Science  for the year 1881.  p.276, the erroneous forms Pramoduta for the two cyclic years Promoda and Pramaddin owe their origin to some old versus memoriales, in two of which we find Promodo ‘tha and Pramadi cha; in course of time the two particles atha and cha were mistaken for portions of the names themselves.  In Tamil the two wrong forms have entirely
superseded the correct ones.

[2] Much interesting information on the right and left hand castes in found in Dr.Oppert’s “On the Original Inhabitants of Bharatavarsha or India,”
Part I, pp.57 to 66.

[3] Sanskrit Uttarashadha.

[4] This hill was probably called after Rajgambhira-Sambuvarayan; see the introduction of Nos.74 and 78.

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