The Indian Analyst
 

South Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Preface

Text of the Inscriptions

Part I    -Sanskrit Inscription

Part II  -Tamil & Grantha Ins.

Part III -Notes & Fragments

Part IV  -Addenda

Other Inscriptions

Tamil Inscriptions

Misc. Ins. from Tamil Country

Chola Inscriptions

Kannada Inscriptions

Telugu Ins. from Andhra Pradesh

Pallava Inscriptions

Pandya Inscriptions

Ins. of Vijayanagara Dynasty

Ins. during 1903-1904

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

PART-II

TAMIL AND GRANTHA INSCRIPTIONS

VI. -INSCRIPTION OF THE KAILASANATHA TEMPLE AT KANCHIPURAM

NO.86. ON A PILLAR IN THE MANDAPA IN FRONT OF  THE RAJASIMVARMESVARA SHRINE

This inscription is dated in the Visudvasu year, which was current after the expiration of Saka year 1286,[1]  and during the reign of Kambana-udaiyar.  The inscription No.87 belongs to the same year, as No.86, and  to the reign of Vira-Kambanna-udaiyar.  As it mentions Koppangal, an official, whose name occurs also in Nos.86 and 87, and as the signatures at its end are identical with some signatures at the end of No.87, the date of  the inscription No.88 cannot have been very distant from that of Nos.86,87 and the, Kilaka year must correspond to Saka 1291.  The inscription No.87, which reads Vira-kumara-kambana-udaiyar, i.e., Kambana-udaiyar, the son of Vira, suggests that Vira-Kambana-udaiyar in No.88 is an abbreviation for Kambana-udaiyar, (the son of) Vira.  The prince, who is mentioned in the three inscriptions Nos.86, 87 and 88, may be further identified with Kambana-udaiyar, the son of Vira-kambana-uadiyar and father of that Ommana-udaiyar, who according to the Tirumalai inscription No.72, above, was reigning in the Ananda year, which was current after the expiration of the Saka year 1296.  The subjoined table shows the results of the above remarks.

      Inscription No.72                          Inscriptions Nos.86, 87 and 88.

Vira-Kambana-udaiyar.                                               Vira

|                                                                         |

     Kambana-udayar.                         Kambana-udaiyar or Kambanna-udaiyar

                  |                                                         (Saka 1288 and 1291)

Ommanna-udaiyar (Saka 1297).

The three inscriptions Nos. 86,87 and 88 contain orders, which were issued by a certain Koppanangal, Koppannangal or Koppanan to the authorities of the temple.  Koppanangal was probably the executive officer of Kambana-udaiyar at Rajasimhavarmesvara, Edudattu –ayiram-udaiya-nayanar and Tirukkarrali-mahadeva.  The last-mentioned term means “the holy stone-temple (of) Siva.” The meaning of the second is not apparent.  The first name, Rajasimhavarmesvara, shows that the Pallava king Rajasimha, the founder of the temple, was not yet forgotten at the times of Kambana-udaiyar, and that his full name was Rajasimhavarman.

From the inscription No.86, we learn that, at the time of Kulottunga-Chola-deva, the Rajasimhavarmesvara Temple at Kanchipuram had been closed, its landed property sold, and its compound and environs transferred to the temple of Anaiyapadangavudaiya-nayanar.[2] Koppanangal ordered, that the temple should be reopened and that its property should be restored.

TRANSLATION

Hail! From the month of Adi of the Visvavasu year, which was current after the Saka year one thousand two hundred and eighty-six (had passed), while the illustrious mahamandalesvara, the conqueror of hostile kings, who break their word, the lord of the eastern and western oceans, the illustrious Kambana-udaiyar, was pleased to rule the earth,-the illustrious Koppanangal (addresses the following) order to the authorities of the temple of Rajasimhavarmesvaram-udaiyar, alais Edudattu –ayiram-udaiya-nayanar at Kanchipuram.  As it is opposed to the sacred law, that formerly, at the  time of Kulottunga-Sora-deva, the shirne of Edudattu –ayiram-udaiya-nayanar

Was closed, that the temple-land (tirunamattu kam) of the lord was sold, and that the temple-compound  (tiruviruppu) and the environs of the temple (tirumadai-vilagam) were given to Anaiyapadangavudaiya –nayanar,-the closing of the shrine of this lord shall cease; the worship and the divine service shall be carried on from the month of Adi forward ; the whole village of Murungai in Panma-nadu, (a division) of Manavir-kottam[3] on the southern frontier (?), and the land included in the boundaries in the four directions shall belong (to the temple) as a sarvamanya (and) free from taxes, as long as the moon and the sun exist.  The northern boundary of the temple-compound of this lord is to the south of a pit on the north, where pandanus-trees grow; the southern  boundary is to the north of a paddy field; the western boundary is to the east of hillock, which forms the limit (?); and the eastern boundary is to the west of a channel near the road (?).  The whole samnidhi street of this lord shall belong (to the temple) as a sarvamanya, as long as the moon and the sun exist.  According to this edict on a palm-leaf, there shall be engraved on stone the amount of what had been cancelled and given away according to the writing on stone, which was formerly engraved on the day, on which (the temple) was closed. (All this) shall be managed and attended to without fail.  This is the signature of Koppanangal.

No.87. ON A PILLAR IN THE MANDAPA IN FRONT OF THE RAJASIMHAVARMESVARA SHRINE

This inscription is dated in the same year and month, as No.86, and during the reign of Kambana-udaiyar, the son of Vira.  It records that, with the sanction of Kopanangal, the authorities of the Rajasimhavarmesvara Temple at Kanchipuram sold some houses in the northern row of the samnidhi  street to certain Mudalies at the price of 150 panas.  

TRANSLATION

Hail! From the month of Adi of the Visvadi [4] year, which was current after the Saka year one thousand two hundred and eighty-six (had passed),while the illustrious mahamandalesvara, the conqueror of hostile kings, the destroyer of those kings who break their word, the lord of the
eastern and western oceans, Kambana-udaiyar, the son of the illustrious Vira, was pleased to rule the earth,-the illustrious Koppannangal (addresses the following) order to the authorities of the temple of thelord Rajasimhavarmesvaram-udaiyar, alias Edudattu-ayiram-udaiya-nayanar, at Kanchipuram.  whereas all the houses and the gardens (attached to) the houses in the northern row of the samnidhi street,-excluding) the matha of Andar Sundara-Perumal, which exists (from) old times, (and excluding) the house, which is to the east of the temple of the lord Tiru-Agastyesvara and to the west of the great road of the sacred bath (tiru-manjana-peru-vari),-were sold at a price (fixed in the presence of the god) Chandesvara to the Mudalis, to be (their) property, from this day forward, for ever, against (payment of) pa. 150, (i.e.) one hundred and fifty panas, which were previously received from these (mudalis) and deposited in the temple-treasury,-these houses, gardens (attached to) the houses . . . . . . . may be sold or mortgaged by them. . . . . . This (order) shall be engraved on stone and copper, in order that it may last from this day forward, as long as the moon and the sun.  This is the signature of Iraguttarayakkalan.  This is the signature of Uttaranmerur-udaiyan Tiruvegamba-velan Aditya-deva, the account (kanakku) of the temple.

NO.88. ON A PILLAR IN THE MANDAPA IN FRONT OF THE RAJASIMHAVARMESVARA SHRINE

This inscription is dated in the Kilaka year (i.e., Saka 1291) and during the reign of Kambanna-udaiyar, (the son of) Vira. It records that , with the sanction of Koppanangal, the temple authorities gave a matha near the temple and some land to a certain Gangayar of Tirumudukunram.  According to lines 9 to 14, Kanchipuram belonged to Eyir-kottam in Jayankonda-Chola-mandalam.  The district of Eyirkottam[5] was probably called after Eyil, i.e.., “the fort,” a village in the Tindivanam Talluqa of the South Arcot District.  Tirumudukunram, i.e., “the holy ancient mountain,” is perhaps meant for its Sanskrit equivalent Vriddhachalam, the head-quarters of a Talluqa in the South Arcot District.

TRANSLATION

Hail! On the day of (the nakshatra) Ter,[6] which corresponds to Tuesday, the seventh lunar day of the latter of the month of Mukara of the Kilaka year, which was current (during the reign) of Kambanna-udaiyar, (the son of) the illustrious Vira,-we, all the followers of the blessed Rudra, (alias) the blessed Mahesvara, and the authorities of the temple of the lord Tirukkarrali-Mahadeva, alias Edudatt-ayiram-udaiya-nayanar[7] at Kanchipuram, a town of Eyirkottam in Jayankonda-Sora-mandalam, gave as ordered by Koppanangal, to Peruman, alias Gangayar, who is worshipped by (i.e., who is the teacher of ?) Sirramur-udaiyan (one) of the Mahasvaras at Tirumudukunram, . . . . . . (for) reciting the Veda in the presence of the god, one matha in the western street[8] and some hereditary land.  (This gift) shall be managed accordingly, as long as the moon and the sun exist.  We, the followers of the blessed Rudra, (alias) the blessed Mahesvara, and the authorities of the temple:-The signature of Kambandan.  This is the signature of Siyar (Simha),  who made the closing (of the temple) cease.  This is the signature of Vira-samba-Brahma-rayar.  The signature of Vidanga-bhatta.  The signature of Iraguttarayakkalan.


[1] This is probably a mistake for 1287, as the Visudeva year corresponds to the current Saka yar 1288.

[2] This temple is situated close to the Kailasanatha Temple.  In the hymns of Tikrunanasambandar and of Nambi Arunanar, alias Sundaramurti,-who, as the Tanjore inscriptions prove (see paragraph 9 of my Progress Report for July, August and September 1888, Madras G.O., 7th November 1888, No.1050, Public), lived before the Chola king Rajaraja-deva,-it is mentioned under the name “Anekathangaapadham”

[3] On Panma-nadu and Manavirkottam, see the introduction of No.151.

[4] I.e., Visvasvasu

[5] See the remarks on Manyirkottam in the introduction of No.151. 

[6] This corresponds to the Sanskrit Rohini

[7] On these two name of the Rajasimhavarmesvara Temple.

[8] The western samnidhi street of the Rajasimhavarmesvara Temple seems to be meant;compare “sannadhith theru” in No.86, line 54, and in No.87, line 22.

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