The Indian Analyst
 

South Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Preface

Introduction

Text of the Inscriptions 

The Pallavas of Kanchi

The Chalukyas of Badami

Rashtrakutas

Western Chalukyas

Tribhuvanamalla Vikramaditya VI

More Inscriptions  

Tamil & Sanskrit Inscription

Tamil Inscriptions 

Misc.Ins from Tamil

Kannada Inscriptions

Telugu Inscriptions

Pallava Inscriptions

Chola Inscriptions

Pandya Inscriptions

Bombay Karnataka Inscriptions

Ins.of Vijayanagara Dynasty

Inscriptions  during 1903-04

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

BOMBAY-KARNATAKA INSCRIPTIONS

VOLUME XI - Part I

THE RASHTRAKUTAS

Krishna II Govinda IV | Krishna III | Kottiadeva 


No. 6

(B.K. No. 148 of 1926-27)

Belhod, Gadag Taluk, Dharwar District

On A Slab Set Up Behind The Temple Of Isvara

The record is not dated.  It refers itself to the reign of Prabhutavarsha Jagattunga.  These birudas or surnames were borne by three kings of the Rashtrakuta family, viz., Govinda II, Govinda III and Govinda IV.  But since the characters are too early for the period of Govinda (IV), the inscription must be assigned either to the reign of Govinda II or of Govinda III, probably the latter.  It records the gift of a gosahasra, evidently at Belhode.

No. 7

(B.K. No. 59 of 1928-29)

Kesarabhavi, Hungund Taluk, Bijapur District

On A Stone Set Up Near Th Temple Of Hanuman

The king’s name which is damaged ends in varsha. Since the record is dated in Saka 759 (=A.D. 837), it may be assigned to the reign of Amoghavarsha I (A.D. 814-15 to 877-78).  It mentions a daughter (name lost) of the king who was perhaps the wife of Yeraganga who was ruling over the Edadore and other districts.

The details of date given in ll.  1-4 and 23-24 are:  Saka 759 (expired), Jyeshtha, ba. 14, Wednesday.  The given tithi fell on Tuesday (not Wednesday), .90.  the date would correspond to A.D. 837, June 5, Tuesday.  The cyclic year must be Pingala.

No. 8

(B.K. No. 92 of 1929-30)

Huvina-Hippargi, Bagevadi Taluk, Bijapur District

On A Broken Pillar Lying Near The Entrance Into The Village

The record belongs to the reign of Amoghavarsha I and is dated in Saka 784, Chitrabhanu (=A.D. 862).  It registers the gift of the village Pipparage (i.e., modern Huvina-Hippargi) situated in the Kannavuri-vishya to the astrologer Goleya-Bhatta.  The gift is stated to be a Ratta-maltanda (martanda)-datti, thus supplying us with a hitherto unknown biruda of the king, viz., Ratra-maltanda (Ratta-martanda).

No. 9

(B.K. No. 93 of 1929-30)

On The Same Pillar

This and the previous record appear to refer to the same gift.  The genealogies of the king and the donee and the boundaries of the village granted, ie., Puvina-Pipparage are here given in detail.  And the occasion for making the gift to Goleya-Bhatta is stated to be the tulapurusha ceremony performed by the king who is called Amoghavarsha and Nirpatinga-Vallabha, at the time of a solar eclipse.  The date of these two records would therefore be A.D. 862, August 28, Friday which was the day of the only solar eclipse in the year Chitrabhanu.

No. 10

(B.K. No. 152 of 1926-27)

Bentur, Gadag Taluk, Dharwar District

On A Hero-Stone Built Into The Wall Of The Annadanappa Tuparis’s House

The inscription which is dated in Saka 785, Tarana (=A.D. 864) belongs to the reign of Amoghavarsha I.  Since a larger portion of the record is seriously damaged, the contents cannot be properly made out.  A grant of land seems to have been made to hero named Chikanna.  Incidentally the record refers to the observance of vratas and sanyasana.  

No. 11

(B.K. No. 60 of 1927-28)

Mevundi, Mundargi Petha, Dharwar District

On A Slab Set Up In Front Of Th Basavanna Temple

The inscription refers itself to the reign of Amoghavarsha I and is dated in Saka [7]86 (=A.D. 865).  It mentions Kuppeyarasa of the Yadava-vamsa.  From the Soratur inscription (Ep. Ind., Vol. XIII, p. 77) we know that he was ruling the Purigere-nadu as a feudatory of the king.  It is evident from the present record that ‘Adva’ the family name of this chief occurring in the Soratur epigraph is only a corruption of ‘Yadava’.

No. 12

(B.K. No. 71 of 1926-27)

Soratur, Gadag Taluk, Dharwar District

On A Slab Set Up Near The Asvathakatte Near The Venkatesa Temple

The record refers itself to the reign of Amoghavarsha I and is dated in Saka 788, Sarvajit (=A.D. 867-868).  It registers a remission of taxes on ghee in favour of the Fifty (gavundas) of Saratapura made by Mahasamanta Ahavaditya Kuppeyarasa of the Yadava-vamsa (see No. 11 above) and a gift of ghee made by the (Community of) Five Hundred.  At the time of the grant, Kuppeyarasa was governing the Purigere-nadu.

No. 13

(B.K. No. 140 of 1926-27)

Gavaravad, Gadag Taluk, Dharwar District

On The Back Of The Slab Set Up In Front Of The Narayadeva Temple

The inscription is dated in Saka, 791 [Virodhi], Vaisakha, su. Punname, lunar eclipse (=A.D. 869, April 29, Friday) and refers itself to the reign of Nripatunga Amoghavarsha I.  It registers a gift of taxes on ghee made to the Mahajanas of Gavadivada when Devannayya was governing Belvola Three hundred.  He is already known from the Nilgund inscription to have been governing this district in A.D. 866 (Ep. Ind., Vol. VI., p. 98 ff.).  Mani-Nagoja engraved the record.

No. 14

(B.K. No. 246 of 1928-29)

Sisuvinahalli, Navalgund Taluk, Dharwar District

On A Slab Set Up In The Hanumantadeva Temple

The record which is dated in Saka 793, Khara, Phalguna, su. (mistake for ba.) 1 Wednesday (mistake for Friday), Hasta (=A.D. 872, February 29, day following a lunar eclipse) refers itself to the reign of Amoghavarsha I.  Devanayya, the Governor of Belvola Three Hundred, is stated to have exempted the Fifty Mahajanas of Sisulahalu from taxes on ghee.  The Mahajanas are described as being equal to brahman in Sruti, Smriti, Vyakarana, Kavya, Natika, Tarka and Agama and are stated to have obtained the village as a gift during the Chalukya times (Saluki-raya)

No. 15

(B.K. No. 15 of 1926-27)

Chinchli, Gadag Taluk, Dharwar District

On Three Faces Of A Broken Pillar Lying Near A Ruined District

The multilated record refers itself to the reing of Amoghavarsha I and bears the Saka 793 (mistake for 795), Vijaya.  It registers the gift of a gosasa, a tank and a garden by a private by a private individual (name lost) after washing the feet of the Fifty-six Mahajanas of Chimchila, when Devannayya was governing Belvola Three Hundred.  The inscription was written by Paramesvara-Bhatta and engraved by Indagoti.

No. 16

(B.K. No. 179 of 1926-27)

Ron Taluk, Dharwar District

On A Stone Lying Close To The Temple Of Basavanna

The inscription refers itself to the reign of Amoghavarsha I and is dated in Saka 796, Jaya, Sravana, solar eclipse (=A.D. 874, July 17).  It registers a grant to the Mahajanas of Rona by Ballavarasa.

No. 17

(B.K. No. 18 of 1927-28)

Karmadi, Ron Taluk, Dharwar District

On A Broken Slab Lying In Front Of The Temple Of Hanuman

The record refers itself to the reign of amoghavarsha, evidently the First.  It is multilated after the king’s name.

No. 18

(B.K. No. 1 of 1928-29)

Aihole, Hungund Taluk, Bijapur District

On A Wall Of The Temple Near The Brahmani Cave-Temple Called Ravulagudi

The inscription refers itself to the reign of Amoghavarsha but it is not dated.  On palaeographic grounds it may be assigned to the reign of Amoghavarsha I.  It states that Balakartara-Bhatara, son (?) of Surya [karttara]-Bhatara spend the Chaturmasya at (place name lost).[1]


[1] The vrata must have evidently been observed in the temple or its vicinity. 

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