The Indian Analyst
 

South Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Preface

Introduction

Text of the Inscriptions 

The Pallavas of Kanchi

The Chalukyas of Badami

Rashtrakutas

Western Chalukyas

Tribhuvanamalla Vikramaditya VI

More Inscriptions  

Tamil & Sanskrit Inscription

Tamil Inscriptions 

Misc.Ins from Tamil

Kannada Inscriptions

Telugu Inscriptions

Pallava Inscriptions

Chola Inscriptions

Pandya Inscriptions

Bombay Karnataka Inscriptions

Ins.of Vijayanagara Dynasty

Inscriptions  during 1903-04

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

BOMBAY-KARNATAKA INSCRIPTIONS

VOLUME XI - Part I

THE PALLAVAS OF KANCHI


No. 1

(B.K. No. 100 of 1928-29)

Badami, Badami Taluk, Bijapur District

On A Rock Behind The Temple Of Mallikarjunadeva

This inscription in Pallva-Grantha characters is much obliterated.  Of the king’s name, only the epithet or surname ‘Mahamalla’ is preserved, and the record has to be assigned to king Narasimhavarman I of the Pallava dynasty of Kanchi.  It is dated in the 13th year of the king’s reign.  From the characters it may be ascribed to about the 7th century A.D.  Badami is herein mentioned under the ancient name of Vatapi.’ According to Dr. Fleet, the present inscription will have to be assigned to the end of the reign of Pulakesin II.

(Published in Ind. Ant., Vol. IX, p 99.  The revised text of the inscription is given below with a plate).

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